Personal criminological theory as you enter this course How would you explain the occurrence of crime and why people commit crime What variables would you consider Identify any assumptions on which your personal theory is based

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Personal Criminological Theory: How to Explain the Occurrence of Crime, and Why People Commit Crime?

People commit crimes for many reasons; this paper is based on the assumption that people commit crimes because they experience some type of wanting, or have needs that have not been fulfilled whether as a child or as a young adult. While not all children that suffer will grow up into criminals, early sociological and psychological theories suggest children at risk for criminal behavior include those children that do not have their basic needs met when young, and thus turn to deviant behaviors to fulfill some gap they perceive or believe they have mentally or emotionally (although in some cases physical needs must also be addressed) (Ashworth, 2003). These needs involve primarily psychological needs and desires, including the desire to feel loved, secure and safe. A person's ability to feel safe, desired, loved and secure arises initially from their relationship with their father and their mother. If one's father and mother fail to demonstrate adequate love relationships, then the children are more likely to develop behavioral disorders resulting in crime in the future. Most children also model their behaviors after the caretakers that raise them. Thus, one would expect children growing up in a disorganized home would be more likely to become criminals than children who are raised in a wholesome and loving environment.

This theory is supported by much in the way of empirical evidence from a sociological and psychological vantage, that suggest people develop behaviors to compensate for needs they feel are not adequately satisfied or to accommodate physical, social or emotional/psychological deficits (Ashworth, 2003). Carrabine, Iganski, Lee et al (2004) note that criminological researchers often draw research techniques used in "sociology, psychology, political science and history to name a few...? of the foundations for their methodologies (p. 9). The researcher go on to note that criminological research is distinctive in that it combines sociology and psychology in interesting ways to explore abnormal behaviors or those that deviate from the expected norm. It is vital in crime to measure it accurately, so this suggests a review of statistics should show whether young children coming from oppressive homes or those lacking direction are more likely to turn to crime than others (Carrabine, Iganski, Lee et al, 2004: 10). Statistics suggest early sociologists believed and confirmed with statistics that crime was a key concern related to youth "delinquency and youthful gangs and crime...? suggesting crime is "bound up with conflict...? that often includes tension and stress associated with interacting with people in society (Carrabine, Iganski, Lee et al, 2004:45). Social pathologies do exist among individuals that suffered or were raised with little formal guidance and structure (Ashworth, 2003).

Variables that would be important to consider explaining the occurrence of crime would include the age when the indicted first committed crime (Ashworth, 2003) as well as their socio-economic status, age, familial status and physical and mental health (Ashworth, 2003). Other important variables to explore would be the incumbents perceptions of their youth and reports of their experiences as youths from the criminal and from the family members of the individual studied. The personal theory proposed assumes that the psychological and early sociological methodologies of inquiry would enable the researcher to explore in more detail what social processes and what psychological processes contribute to criminal behavior or deviant activity, whether exemplified in youth or as young adults.

References

Ashworth, A. (2003) 'Is Restorative Justice the Way Forward for Criminal Justice?' in

E., McLaughlin, R. Fergusson, G. Hughes and L. Westmarland (Eds) Restorative Justice: Critical Issues, London: Sage.

Carrabine, Eamonn; Iganski, Paul; Lee, Maggy; Plummer, Ken; & South, Nigel. (2004)

Criminology: A Sociological Introduction. New York: Routledge.[continue]

Cite this term paper

"Personal Criminological Theory As You Enter This Course How Would You Explain The Occurrence Of Crime And Why People Commit Crime What Variables Would You Consider Identify Any Assumptions On Which Your Personal Theory Is Based" (2007, December 10) Retrieved September 3, 2015, from http://www.paperdue.com/essay/personal-criminological-theory-as-you-enter-33442

"Personal Criminological Theory As You Enter This Course How Would You Explain The Occurrence Of Crime And Why People Commit Crime What Variables Would You Consider Identify Any Assumptions On Which Your Personal Theory Is Based" 10 December 2007. Web.3 September. 2015. <http://www.paperdue.com/essay/personal-criminological-theory-as-you-enter-33442>

"Personal Criminological Theory As You Enter This Course How Would You Explain The Occurrence Of Crime And Why People Commit Crime What Variables Would You Consider Identify Any Assumptions On Which Your Personal Theory Is Based", 10 December 2007, Accessed.3 September. 2015, http://www.paperdue.com/essay/personal-criminological-theory-as-you-enter-33442

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