Abnormal Psychology -- Anxiety, Affective, Thesis

Excerpt from Thesis :

For example, a person with high anxiety over having high blood pressure may have a family history of heart attacks (Pinel, 2006).

Mood or Affective Disorders

Many people feel depressed sometimes, for example, after a tragic event, such as the death of a loved one. However, most people are able to recover from depression. Individuals with mood or affective disorders like major depression or bipolar affective disorder experience extreme sadness and/or mania throughout their entire lives.

Those with major depression are plagued with profound sadness and/or the inability to feel pleasure (Kring, et.al., 2007, 230). Such depression may be so severe that it makes it painful to keep up with everyday activities (Pinel, 2006). Those with major depression may not be able to fall or stay asleep, while others may complain of being tired even after sleeping for hours (Kring, et.al., 2007, 230). Individuals with bipolar affective disorder experience periods of major depression but also periods of extreme mania (Pinel, 2006). Mood disorders are genetic and may most likely be linked to stress (Pinel, 2006).

Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders

Somatoform disorders are characterized by the complaint of certain bodily symptoms that may suggest a physical defect or dysfunction, many times exaggerated, for which no physiological basis can be discovered (Kring, et.al, 2007, 159). For example, pain disorder, body dysfunction disorder, and so on. Dissociative disorders, on the other hand, are disruptions of consciousness (Kring et.al., 2007, 159). As such, a person with a dissociative disorder may lose their sense of self-awareness, memory and even identity (Kring et.al., 2007, 159). Examples of dissociative disorders include dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder.

Individuals

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Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders

Somatoform disorders are characterized by the complaint of certain bodily symptoms that may suggest a physical defect or dysfunction, many times exaggerated, for which no physiological basis can be discovered (Kring, et.al, 2007, 159). For example, pain disorder, body dysfunction disorder, and so on. Dissociative disorders, on the other hand, are disruptions of consciousness (Kring et.al., 2007, 159). As such, a person with a dissociative disorder may lose their sense of self-awareness, memory and even identity (Kring et.al., 2007, 159). Examples of dissociative disorders include dissociative amnesia and dissociative identity disorder.

Individuals

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https://www.paperdue.com/essay/abnormal-psychology-anxiety-affective-18686