Buddhism Annotated Bibliography Adam, J. Annotated Bibliography

Excerpt from Annotated Bibliography :

Through a period of persecution and assimilation, however, much of the Buddhist traditions and writings were translated into Taoist terminology -- incorporating such elements as vegetarianism, banning alcohol, meditation, and the path toward enlightenment. Since the relaxation of bans on religion, most surveys believe that about 50% of Chinese identify themselves with Buddhism, and many with both Buddhism and Taoism, seeing both as part of their cultural heritage.

Esposito, et.al. (2010). Religion and Globalization. Postcoloniam Challenges. New York: Oxford

University Press, pp. 439+.

After World War II, the People's Republic of China was established with a philosophical bent towards a Chinese interpretation of Marxism/Leninism. The idea of religion was that it was the "opiate of the masses." Religion was discouraged, but since Confucianism is both a philosophical and ethical system that focuses on the family and tradition, the government relaxed a bit and allowed more focus on philosophy -- Chinese Taoism which supports martial arts, astrology medicine, and social boundaries, tied up with acculturation of the teachings of Confucius. Buddhism and Confucianism do not necessarily consider themselves to be religions, but more philosophical paths to the right way, which allows less post-colonial pressure than standard religion. However, the historical and cultural tradition of religion remains strong in Asia based on Ancient culture.

Goldman, J. "Buddhist Care Givers Console Those Approaching Death." The Dallas Morning

News. 28 March 1998.

During stressful or situations filled with anxiety, it is often helpful talk or receive advice or counsel from a calm and/or spiritual person. A Buddhist monk works as a chaplain in a New York City hospital, helping those in need of spiritual care find some solace in the concept of death. This is becoming increasingly common across the United States, whereby practitioners of Buddhism are counseling Westerners about physical death. Not only does the
Parts of this Document are Hidden
Click Here to View Entire Document
philosophy of Buddhism seem to comfort those fearing death, the meditative and transcendental qualities have an overall healing effect for many. By practicing meditation, for instance, Buddhists believe they can understand fear and learn how to control their bodies, and even transcend fear. The idea of not fearing death and understanding more the process of nature can be comforting to many -- if one does not fear death then illness and eventual death is seen as a cycle of life. Buddhist philosophy can, then, bring additional peace and calmness to those -- regardless of their religious nature, or even those who are atheist or agnostic.

Rifkin, I. (2004). Buddhism: Bodhisattvas in Boardrooms. In Spiritual Perspectives on Globalization. Minneapolis, MN: Skylight Paths Publishers.

For 2,500 years, Buddhism has been focused on a middle-path -- one of neither self-indulgence nor self-denial and, according to tradition, following this path the Buddha finally learned of truth and attained Supreme Enlightenment. Modern Buddhism seeks to merge traditional Buddhism with the realities of modern life. It teaches one to be a realist, and to understand that the world contains much suffering when overt desire exists, and that through peace and right conduct, wisdom and enlightenment may release the individual from desire and suffering. Additionally, the idea of Zen meditation, central to the Buddhist way of thinking, has been shown to not only bring comfort to those in physical pain, but to help business leaders focus, become more efficient, reduce fatigue and be open for creative problem solving. While it may seem wondrous to get all our wishes, as humans it would also seem that we would continue to exist as shells of our souls, but we would have no purpose or direction, no drive, nothing to work toward, nothing to fail and learn. It is our failures that propel us forward, cause technology and culture to evolve, to move into a path that transcends the mundane.

Sources Used in Documents:

During stressful or situations filled with anxiety, it is often helpful talk or receive advice or counsel from a calm and/or spiritual person. A Buddhist monk works as a chaplain in a New York City hospital, helping those in need of spiritual care find some solace in the concept of death. This is becoming increasingly common across the United States, whereby practitioners of Buddhism are counseling Westerners about physical death. Not only does the philosophy of Buddhism seem to comfort those fearing death, the meditative and transcendental qualities have an overall healing effect for many. By practicing meditation, for instance, Buddhists believe they can understand fear and learn how to control their bodies, and even transcend fear. The idea of not fearing death and understanding more the process of nature can be comforting to many -- if one does not fear death then illness and eventual death is seen as a cycle of life. Buddhist philosophy can, then, bring additional peace and calmness to those -- regardless of their religious nature, or even those who are atheist or agnostic.

Rifkin, I. (2004). Buddhism: Bodhisattvas in Boardrooms. In Spiritual Perspectives on Globalization. Minneapolis, MN: Skylight Paths Publishers.

For 2,500 years, Buddhism has been focused on a middle-path -- one of neither self-indulgence nor self-denial and, according to tradition, following this path the Buddha finally learned of truth and attained Supreme Enlightenment. Modern Buddhism seeks to merge traditional Buddhism with the realities of modern life. It teaches one to be a realist, and to understand that the world contains much suffering when overt desire exists, and that through peace and right conduct, wisdom and enlightenment may release the individual from desire and suffering. Additionally, the idea of Zen meditation, central to the Buddhist way of thinking, has been shown to not only bring comfort to those in physical pain, but to help business leaders focus, become more efficient, reduce fatigue and be open for creative problem solving. While it may seem wondrous to get all our wishes, as humans it would also seem that we would continue to exist as shells of our souls, but we would have no purpose or direction, no drive, nothing to work toward, nothing to fail and learn. It is our failures that propel us forward, cause technology and culture to evolve, to move into a path that transcends the mundane.

Cite This Annotated Bibliography:

"Buddhism Annotated Bibliography Adam J " (2012, November 20) Retrieved January 17, 2021, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/buddhism-annotated-bibliography-adam-j-76550

"Buddhism Annotated Bibliography Adam J " 20 November 2012. Web.17 January. 2021. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/buddhism-annotated-bibliography-adam-j-76550>

"Buddhism Annotated Bibliography Adam J ", 20 November 2012, Accessed.17 January. 2021,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/buddhism-annotated-bibliography-adam-j-76550