Canadian Aboriginals the Interaction Between Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

The substance had devastating effects on them, and, it assisted them into growing more detested by white people. Certain white people engaged in observing native behavior have even observed the aftermath that alcohol had brought upon the Indian society. Some white people have even triggered alarms relating to the fact that Indians were hurriedly becoming wiped out, just as several animal species in Canada.

The Native Americans in the U.S. did not receive a different treatment than the ones in Canada. Furthermore, they had gotten to the point when the government did not accept them as a minority and even condemned them if they tried to claim their rights as natives. Any resolutions made by the League of Indians in Canada were met with harsh rejections from the government, with the officials declaring that there had been no need for them to abolish perfectly normal amendments. The elder Indians had been aware that the schooling system of the time and the fact that the authorities were obliging natives to change their ways of living would slowly but surely destroy their society.

Most movies from the western genre made during the first half of the twentieth century reflected the opinion that white people had about natives. Indians were regarded as savages and lazy people only interested in stealing and torturing an apparently perfect white society. A great number of people actually had the impression that their governments were actually helping the Indians. The officials almost became saints in the eyes of the public when they chose to make rehabilitation programs intended to help the Indians escape their miserable customs. If one were to perform a survey involving whether Indians deserved to inhabit America or not, he or she would have definitely been amazed to see that most American and Canadian citizens of the time shared racist convictions. It is of no surprise that they did so, considering the fact that the media and the authorities were constantly discussing matters such as Indians being inferior.

The coming of the economic crisis did not change the conditions between the aboriginal Canadian population and the Canadian government. The coming of the Second World War had also contributed to the authorities abandoning any form of negotiation with the Indian political leaders. In spite of the fact that Indians continued to be oppressed over the war, they had actually been advantaged by the occurrence. Witnessing the atrocities performed by the Germans, people could understand what it meant to be a tyrant and that it had been wrong to display such a behavior.

In response to the constant oppression that their people have undergone for centuries, the Native Americans have struggled to have a monument built in honor of their heroes. The Crazy Horse memorial stands as one of the largest sculptures in the world and it is dedicated to the Indian that refused to subject to the white man.

Works cited:

1. Buckley, Helen. (1993). From Wooden Ploughs to Welfare: Why Indian Policy Failed in the Prairie Provinces. McGill-Queen's Press -- MQUP.

2. Dickason, Olive Patricia. (1992). "Canada's first nations: a history of founding peoples from earliest times." Editorial Galaxia.

3. Haycock, Graham Ronald. Laurier, Wilfrid. "The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970." University Press, 1970.

4. Howlett, Michael. "Policy Paradigms and Policy Change: Lessons from the Old and New Canadian Policies towards Aboriginal Peoples." Policy Studies Journal, Vol. 22, 1994.

5. Mieder, Wolfgang. The Only Good Indian is a Dead Indian History and Meaning of a Proverbial Stereotype. Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 106, 1993.

6. Milloy, John. (1999). "A National Crime: The Canadian Government and the Residential School System." University of Manitoba Press.

7. Wishart, David J. (2004). Encyclopedia of the Great Plains. U of Nebraska Press.

Dickason, Olive Patricia. (1992). "Canada's first nations: a history of founding peoples from earliest times." Editorial Galaxia.

Mieder, Wolfgang. The Only Good Indian is a Dead Indian History and Meaning of a Proverbial Stereotype. Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 106, 1993.

Buckley, Helen. (1993). From Wooden Ploughs to Welfare: Why Indian Policy Failed in the Prairie Provinces. McGill-Queen's Press -- MQUP.

Buckley, Helen. (1993). From Wooden Ploughs to Welfare: Why Indian Policy Failed in the Prairie Provinces. McGill-Queen's Press -- MQUP.

Mieder, Wolfgang. The Only Good Indian is a Dead Indian History and Meaning of a Proverbial Stereotype. Journal of American Folklore, Vol. 106, 1993.

Haycock, Graham Ronald. Laurier, Wilfrid. "The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970." University Press, 1970.

Haycock, Graham Ronald. Laurier, Wilfrid. "The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970." University Press, 1970.

idem

Howlett, Michael. "Policy Paradigms and Policy Change: Lessons from the Old and New Canadian Policies towards Aboriginal Peoples." Policy Studies Journal, Vol. 22, 1994.

Haycock, Graham Ronald. Laurier, Wilfrid. "The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian as a Subject and a Concept in a Sampling of the Popular National Magazines Read in Canada, 1900-1970." University Press, 1970.

Milloy, John. (1999). "A National Crime: The Canadian Government and the Residential School System." University of Manitoba Press.

idem

Dickason, Olive Patricia. (1992). "Canada's first nations: a history of founding peoples from earliest times." Editorial Galaxia.

Haycock, Graham Ronald. Laurier, Wilfrid. "The Image of the Indian: The Canadian Indian…

Cite This Essay:

"Canadian Aboriginals The Interaction Between" (2009, August 15) Retrieved August 23, 2017, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/canadian-aboriginals-the-interaction-between-19934

"Canadian Aboriginals The Interaction Between" 15 August 2009. Web.23 August. 2017. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/canadian-aboriginals-the-interaction-between-19934>

"Canadian Aboriginals The Interaction Between", 15 August 2009, Accessed.23 August. 2017,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/canadian-aboriginals-the-interaction-between-19934