Classroom Critical Incidents Are an Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :



Another lesson to be learned is the importance of reflective thinking, in which teachers and students reflect on their actions (Griffin, 2003). Reflective thinking is particularly important as it ensures that people learn from their behavior, and it endows them with heightened self-awareness. For example, through reflective thinking the teachers in each of the critical incidents would understand the importance of using positive reinforcement, which has been shown to alleviate many disciplinary issues (Tulley and Chu, 1995).

Another lesson is that in addition to open communication, there must be collaborative interaction between students and teachers whereby they engage in a continuous and mutually supportive dialogue (Neale et al., 2000). Collaborative interaction resembles open communication, but is grounded in action rather than just dialogue. Implementing collaborative action would ensure that the needs of the intellectually curious students (the student in the United States history class and the one in the 8th grade English class) are met via private meetings with the instructor, and it would also ensure that the student athlete in the second critical incident works productively with the teacher to ensure that they are 'on the same page.'

Ultimately, critical incidents are so named since they can occur at any time and leave an indelible impact on students and teachers. However, through open communication and collaborative interaction, the negative effects of critical incidents can be greatly alleviated and they represent great possibilities for personal and professional growth.

References

Griffin, M.L. (2003). Using critical incidents to promote and assess reflective thinking in preservice teachers. Reflective Practice: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 4(2), 207-220.

Neale, D.C., et al. (2000). Collaborative critical incident development. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Annual Meeting, 44(37), 598-601.

Tulley, M., & Chu, L.H. (1995). Student teachers and classroom discipline. The Journal of Education Research, 88(3), 164-171.

Watts, M., et al. (1997). Prompting teachers' constructive reflection: Pupils' questions…

Sources Used in Document:

References

Griffin, M.L. (2003). Using critical incidents to promote and assess reflective thinking in preservice teachers. Reflective Practice: International and Multidisciplinary Perspectives, 4(2), 207-220.

Neale, D.C., et al. (2000). Collaborative critical incident development. Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Annual Meeting, 44(37), 598-601.

Tulley, M., & Chu, L.H. (1995). Student teachers and classroom discipline. The Journal of Education Research, 88(3), 164-171.

Watts, M., et al. (1997). Prompting teachers' constructive reflection: Pupils' questions as critical incidents. International Journal of Science Education, 19(9), 1025-1037.

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