Disorder Adult Attachment Theory Attachment Essay

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Mary Ainsworth, conveyed Bowlby's theory to the United States and came up with a technique of examining infant attachment. In her book, she talks about this extensively utilized procedure, the bizarre condition, and the outlines of protected and apprehensive attachment. In the beginning three outlines were looked at, protected, nervous avoidant, and nervous ambivalent, but later on Mary Main and Judith Solomon at the University of California in Berkeley came up with a fourth category, disordered. The anxious-avoidant and disordered kinds wanted attachment but had anxiety as a result of attachment. In addition, both had apprehension at the departure of the mother and were hard to pacify upon reunion. The disordered children were predominantly unsure upon reuniting with their attachment figure, both seeking out and staying away from contact. Bowlby portrayed these children as moving away crossly while at the same time seeking nearness when reunited with their mothers. Even though the nervous avoidant children appeared to be satisfied in the nonattendance of their attachment figure and not predominantly concerned in reconnecting upon reuniting, when physiological actions were looked at, these children were fairly nervous throughout separation, but in some way figured out how to suppress their thoughts (Sonkin, 2005).

Attachment theory is intended to explain and make clear people's continuing behaviors in regards to relationships from birth to death. This area overlaps considerably with that of Interpersonal Theory. Since attachment is believed to have an evolutionary foundation, attachment theory is also connected to Evolutionary Psychology. Attachment approaches in adults are believed to come right from the working molds or mental models of oneself and others that have been developed all through infancy and childhood. Ainsworth's classification of attachment models has been converted into expressions of adult romantic associations in the following ways:

Secure adults discover it fairly simple to get next to others and are comfortable relying on others and having others rely on them.

Avoidant adults are not comfortable being next to others. They find it hard to believe in others totally, and hard to permit themselves to rely on others.

Nervous ambivalent adults find that other people are unwilling to get as secure as they would like. Nervous ambivalent adults frequently agonize that their spouse doesn't truly feel affection for them. Nervous ambivalent adults want to combine entirely with another person, and this longing on occasion pushes people away.

The lack of secure attachment generates sizeable anguish, resulting in susceptibility to a diversity of physical, emotional, social and moral troubles. Attachment skills and patterns expand into adult life, and have an effect on approaches to security, personal sense given to experiences and relationships, the capability to develop and uphold close affectionate ties, and disagreement and feelings of separation frequently experienced by couples (Adult Attachment, 2010).

References

Adult Attachment. (2010). Retrieved October 21, 2010, from Adoption Web site:

http://attachment.adoption.com/bonding/adult-attachment.html

Attachment Theory. (2002). Retrieved October 21, 2010, from Web site:

http://www.personalityresearch.org/attachment.html

Sonkin, Daniel (2005). Attachment Theory and Psychotherapy. The California Therapist, 17(1),

pp…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Adult Attachment. (2010). Retrieved October 21, 2010, from Adoption Web site:

http://attachment.adoption.com/bonding/adult-attachment.html

Attachment Theory. (2002). Retrieved October 21, 2010, from Web site:

http://www.personalityresearch.org/attachment.html

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