Economic Social South Pacific Essay

Length: 2 pages Sources: 2 Subject: Weather Type: Essay Paper: #18287980 Related Topics: Economic Growth, Climate Change, Climate, Migration
Excerpt from Essay :

Region that I have chosen is the South Pacific, or more broadly Oceania. If we exclude Australia and New Zealand, the two highly developed economies, this region is characterized by island nations, mostly small, with tiny economies. Many such islands are independent nations, while others are colonies (i.e. French Polynesia, Cook Islands, Guam). Most nations within this region have ties to larger economies, either the U.S., New Zealand or Australia, regardless of their political status.

For the most part, these regions are politically stable. The Pacific islands are, in many cases, subject to many political issues. At the global level, these nations are among the most vulnerable to climate change. Rising sea levels are an existential threat to countries like Tuvalu, which is almost entirely at sea level (Allen, 2004). Thus, many of these island nations have become the leading spokespeople for action on climate change, increasing their profile in the international community. They are also dependent on fishing and coral reefs, both of which are threatened by increasing ocean acidity (Hoegh, 2007).

These islands are also affected by the economic changes in the financing. They need their sponsor nations to continue to be healthy enough to make ongoing contributions, so the Pacific islands remain at least somewhat affected by the economic environment.

Social changes will also affect many of these nations. Among the issues for them is migration. Many island nations have more citizens living off-island, in places like Brisbane, Auckland or Honolulu, than they have in their own countries. This has both positive and negative effects on their economies. These expats are a source of remittances, and thus a valuable source of income, but their leaving the islands represents a drain of both brains and talent. Furthermore, there is social disruption from such migration as the result of too many young people leaving, difficulty in keeping family units together, and the erosion of social support systems back home. These expats may also lose a sense of their own cultural identity, particularly if they…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Allen, L. (2004). Will Tuvalu disappear beneath the sea? Smithsonian. Retrieved November 30, 2014 from http://www.smithsonianmag.com/travel/will-tuvalu-disappear-beneath-the-sea-180940704/?no-ist

Hoegh, O. (2007). Coral reefs under rapid climate change and ocean acidification. Science. Vol. 318 (2007) 1737-1742.


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