Ethics & Sharks Ethical Issues Term Paper

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Sharks Are Dangerous to People:

Finally, with respect to the argument that sharks constitute a genuine danger because they often attack and eat human beings, that point is both inaccurate and simplistic. Sharks actually avoid human beings except where drawn to us, either by the scent of blood in the water or perceptible signs of physical stress, both of which they evolved over many millions of years to detect (Perrine 1995). The evidence actually suggests that many fatal attacks on humans are the result of sharks' mistaking us for their usual prey; that accounts for the relative frequency with which sharks initiate only one test bite without pursuing the attack further (Stevens 1999). In fact, the vast majority of shark attacks on human are attributable to the ridiculous practice of feeding sharks in the open ocean, such as in conjunction with tourist cruises and diving expeditions. These practices condition sharks to associate human beings with food (Broad 2001) thereby precipitating fatal encounters. In any case, even were it true that sharks actively hunted humans to the
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extent that it required culling their numbers, that issue remains completely distinguishable from the obligation to do so less cruelly rather than more cruelly, without regard for their suffering. Fishing for shark as food is one thing; slicing body parts from a living creature is quite another.

References

Bright, M. (1994) Intelligence in Animals: The Earth, Its Wonders, Its Secrets.

Montreal: Reader's Digest Books

Broad, W. Scientists Say Frenzy Over Shark Attack Is Unwarranted; the New York Times (9/5/01). Accessed April 29, 2008, at: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F0DE3D61439F936A3575AC0A9679C8B63&n=Top/News/Science/Topics/Sharks

Gerrig, R, Zimbardo, P. (2005) Psychology and Life. 17th Edition.

New York: Allyn & Bacon.

Moussaieff-Masson, J. (1995) When Elephants Weep: The Emotional Lives of Animals. New York: Bantam.

Perrine, D. Sharks. (1995) Stillwater: Voyageur

Ritter, E. (2000) Anatomy of Shark Accidents; SharkInfo. Accessed April 29, 2008, at http://www.sharkinfo.ch/SI4_99e/accidents.html

Schmalleger, Frank. (1997) Criminal Justice Today: An Introductory Text for the 21st Century. Hoboken, NJ: Prentice Hall

Stevens, J. (1999) Sharks. New York: Checkmark

Tangley, L. (10/30/2000) Animal Emotions: Do Animals Have Feelings?;

U.S. News & World Report. Tripp, P. (2003) World Issues: Animal Rights.

North Mankota, MN: Chrysalis Books.

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Bright, M. (1994) Intelligence in Animals: The Earth, Its Wonders, Its Secrets.

Montreal: Reader's Digest Books

Broad, W. Scientists Say Frenzy Over Shark Attack Is Unwarranted; the New York Times (9/5/01). Accessed April 29, 2008, at: http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9F0DE3D61439F936A3575AC0A9679C8B63&n=Top/News/Science/Topics/Sharks

Gerrig, R, Zimbardo, P. (2005) Psychology and Life. 17th Edition.

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