Fake News Media Literacy And Research Essay

Length: 2 pages Sources: 2 Subject: Media Type: Essay Paper: #83209920 Related Topics: Healthcare, Media Literacy, Propaganda, Free Speech
Excerpt from Essay :

Assignment 1

My personal communication style is passionate but becoming more balanced. Presenting arguments in a calm and logical manner is one of the great challenges of human communication. The ancient Greeks articulated rhetorical strategies that used pathos, ethos, and logos to show how an effective argument is not just emotional but also logical and credible. In the past, I have reverted to emotional appeals too much when making a case. Academic writing has taught me the value of taking a step back from my emotions and considering other points of view.

I have learned that an academic argument can take on many different forms, but generally includes four main components. Those four components include the claim, the evidence, the counterargument, and the rebuttal (“English 122: Composition II An Introduction to Argument,” n.d.). The claim is my position, or my thesis statement. The evidence comprises the factual foundation for my argument, the logos component of the argument. The counterargument is where I can consider alternative points of view, and the rebuttal is where I respond to those opposing points of view using logic and reason.

A recent argument I experienced was related to healthcare, and the opposing views of insurance providers versus patients and healthcare workers. One side was claiming that the healthcare system needs to remain profit-driven in order to stimulate competition in a human rights and social justice ethics.

After reading course materials on rhetoric and effective arguments, the only concern I have is with how to keep my emotions out of verbal exchanges, when I do not have the time to take a step back and reflect like I do with most academic assignments.

Assignment 2

After considering the information in this week’s instructor guidance and readings, I have selected the research topic on fake news. Why is “fake news” so hard to identify and what can be done to limit its influence in society? Propaganda has always been a pernicious problem, but now more than ever, consumers are lured by any argument they read online. Professional journalists, bloggers, politicians, celebrities, and private citizens are struggling to find validity and truth in information in the digital age.

After reviewing the library tutorials, I have identified ten keywords for my research, which include “fake news,” “media literacy,” “truth in journalism,” “journalistic integrity,” critical thinking,” “Fake news in…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

“English 122: Composition II An Introduction to Argument,” (n.d.). Ashford University.



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