Holocaust And Its Effect On Thesis

Length: 5 pages Sources: 3 Subject: Drama - World Type: Thesis Paper: #92731362 Related Topics: Poland, Europe, Cause And Effect, Jewish Studies
Excerpt from Thesis :

This triggered the mass emigration of Jews to Israel and to other countries that has been discussed in the paragraphs above. Most likely, the trust had never existed to the fullest degree, but the Holocaust and its impact assured that it would be difficult to regain it in the future.

Culturally, in all of Europe, but more notably in Central Europe, the effect of the Holocaust in its aftermath was remarkable. Starting with Theodor Adorno's mention that "writing poetry after Auschwitz is barbaric," many Jewish and non-Jewish inhabitants of Central Europe continued to create often based on the experience of the Holocaust or, in many cases, with direct descriptions of their own experiences as part of the Holocaust. The emotional impact that the Holocaust had on people in Central Europe was often expressed in art and culture. At the same time, the weight of the conscience for the event that had occurred was also transformed in many valuable works of art.

On another hand, however, the Holocaust left many of the sites of Jewish cultural heritage in countries such as Poland, Hungary or Romania abandoned, with a great impact on the role and implication of the Jewish culture in Central Europe. Examples are numerous, with travelers and theoreticians mentioning that "many synagogues and study houses still stand on Jazefa Street, but they have been converted into private homes" and that "the renowned Cracow Yeshiva still stands on Esther Street, but is totally abandoned"

Putting all of these elements together, one can point out that the effects of the aftermath of the Holocaust on Central Europe, as well as of the Holocaust itself, were numerous and, in many ways, similar to those in Western Europe. There is, however, one important element that significantly differentiates the two: the scale of the Holocaust in Central Europe. Indeed, as previously shown, in many of the countries in Central Europe, the Jewish minority simply disappeared and was exterminated. From the Jews in Western Europe, the emigration option exacted before the War and was exercised by many who were then able to return to these countries after the War ended.

There is another issue worth mentioning when referring to the economy of these countries, the demographics or the cultural life. At the same time, the effects marked the conscience and psychology of the individuals living in these countries were the marks of the Holocaust still exist.

Bibliography

1. The Aftermath of the Holocaust. Encyclopedia. Updated May 4, 2009. On the Internet at https://secure.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005129. Last retrieved on November 18, 2009

2. Legacy -- the aftermath of the Holocaust. On the Internet at http://openlearn.open.ac.uk/mod/resource/view.php?id=170639. Last retrieved on November 18, 2009

3. Bolaffi, Guido. Dictionary of Race, Ethnicity and Culture. Sage Publications Ltd. 1st edition. December- 2002.

4. Preusser, Kate. Poetry after Auschwitz. The Stranger. June 2004. On the Internet at http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/Content?oid=18521. Last retrieved on November 18, 2009

5. Vinecour, Earl. Polish Jews: The Final Chapter (New York: McGraw Hill Book Co., 1977),

Ibid.

The Aftermath of the Holocaust. Encyclopedia. Updated May 4, 2009. On the Internet at https://secure.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005129. Last retrieved on November 18, 2009

Legacy -- the aftermath of the Holocaust. On the Internet at http://openlearn.open.ac.uk/mod/resource/view.php?id=170639. Last retrieved on November 18, 2009

Bolaffi, Guido. Dictionary of Race, Ethnicity and Culture. Sage Publications Ltd. 1st edition. December- 2002.

Preusser, Kate. Poetry after Auschwitz. The Stranger. June 2004. On the Internet at http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/Content?oid=18521. Last retrieved on November 18, 2009

Earl Vinecour Polish Jews: The Final Chapter (New York: McGraw Hill Book Co., 1977),

Ibid.

Sources Used in Documents:

Bibliography

1. The Aftermath of the Holocaust. Encyclopedia. Updated May 4, 2009. On the Internet at https://secure.ushmm.org/wlc/article.php?lang=en&ModuleId=10005129. Last retrieved on November 18, 2009

2. Legacy -- the aftermath of the Holocaust. On the Internet at http://openlearn.open.ac.uk/mod/resource/view.php?id=170639. Last retrieved on November 18, 2009

3. Bolaffi, Guido. Dictionary of Race, Ethnicity and Culture. Sage Publications Ltd. 1st edition. December- 2002.

4. Preusser, Kate. Poetry after Auschwitz. The Stranger. June 2004. On the Internet at http://www.thestranger.com/seattle/Content?oid=18521. Last retrieved on November 18, 2009


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