Intelligence-Led Policing Is a Strategy Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

cops.usdoj.gov) (p. 45).

Intelligence-Led Policing and Theories of Criminology

Rational choice, as defined by Larry Seigel, is when an offender makes a rational choice to break the law to either improve his personal situation or to further a value he holds as important. The rational choice to break the law is partly based on "…how efficient the local police happen to be…" and in the case of ILP, if the police and the community are united and the signs of cooperation are clearly evident, it may prevent the potential criminal from taking action.

In the case of the psychological trait theory, psychologists will be incorporated into the Intelligence-Led Policing because their expertise can provide important clues as to what to expect from criminals vis-a-vis behaviors that reflect their intentions. Further, the psychological traits of police officers can make a difference in becoming familiar with the various personalities in the community. For example, the personality traits of female police officers -- which tend towards a "…compassionate, sympathetic, and diplomatic" approach to interaction with members of the community (law-abiding and law-breaking members) -- can play an important role in gathering intelligence for ILP databases (Plotnik, et al., 2010). Male police officers tend to be more "…assertive, aggressive, and direct" which may not be as successful when law enforcement seeks citizen information regarding potential threats, Plotnik explains. In other words, gathering intelligence by interacting professionally with members of the community -- the eyes that are needed to detect suspicious activities -- are in all those houses and apartments, and police need access to those citizens.

The conflict theory applies to ILP in certain cases, namely those radicals and terrorists that are angry at the U.S. For its support of Israel; identifying individuals in the community who clearly have a grudge against the U.S. For political reasons will be an important part of ILP.

In conclusion, there will be new and modified theories of criminal behavior as ILP gains momentum and is implemented in more communities. There will be learning within law enforcement departments -- learning about the potential terrorist or organized crime activities in post-9/11 America, and learning how to engage community members to become the eyes and ears of law enforcement before criminals have a chance to carry out the plans.

Works Cited

Plotnik, Rod, and Kouyoumdjian, Haig. (2010). Introduction to Psychology. Florence, KY:

Cengage Learning.

Regoli, Robert M, and Hewitt, John D. (2009). Exploring Criminal Justice: The Essentials.

Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

Keel, Robert. (2006). Rational Choice and Deterrence Theory / Larry Siegel (1992).

University of Missouri / St. Louis. Retrieved December 15, 2011, from http://www.umsl.edu/~Keelr/200/ratchoc.html.

U.S. Department of Justice. (2008). Intelligence-Led Policing: The Integration of Community

Policing and Law Enforcement Intelligence. Retrieved December 15, 2011, from www.cops.usdoj.gov/pdf/e09042536_Chapter_04.pdf.

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Plotnik, Rod, and Kouyoumdjian, Haig. (2010). Introduction to Psychology. Florence, KY:

Cengage Learning.

Regoli, Robert M, and Hewitt, John D. (2009). Exploring Criminal Justice: The Essentials.

Burlington, MA: Jones & Bartlett Learning.

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