Louis Sullivan "Form Follows Function" Research Paper

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His belief, of course, was that the Unity was of primary importance -- which was a departure from Sullivan's sense that beauty and transcendent forms (reflections of the human spirit) were central to the idea of all forms. Wright's anti-verticality was no more in tune to Sullivan's sense of the soul than the Breuer's "functional" brutalism. Sullivan alone had the sense to achieve some sort of aesthetic standard while achieving the function so desired by his contractors.

Conclusion

In conclusion, Sullivan announced at the end of the 19th century that "form ever follows function" -- but that did not imply that form had to be as mechanical as function. In fact, it meant for Sullivan quite the opposite. The Guaranty Building is a perfect example of how he saw architecture as an art: its purpose was to provide the space necessary for offices and retailers but also to make the structure as aesthetically appealing to the human spirit as possible. In Sullivan's eyes, form had function -- and that function was to ornament.

Bibliography

Kaufman, Mervyn. Father of Skyscrapers: A Biography of Louis Sullivan. Boston:

Little, Brown, 1969.

Korom, Joseph. The American Skyscraper, 1850-1940: a celebration of height. Boston:

Branden Books, 2008.

Morrison, Hugh. Louis Sullivan,
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Prophet of Modern Architecture. NY: W.W. Norton & Company, 2001.

Pfeiffer, Bruce, ed. Frank Lloyd Wright: In the Realm of Ideas. IL: Southern Illinois

University Press, 1988.

Pile, John F. A History of Interior Design. London: Laurence King Publishing, 2005.

Secrest, Meryle. Frank Lloyd Wright: a biography. IL: University of Chicago Press,

1992.

Sullivan, Louis. "The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered." Lippincott's

Magazine, 1896.

Twombly, Robert C. Louis Sullivan: The Poetry of Architecture. NY: W.W. Norton & Company, 2000.

Louis Sullivan, "The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered" (Lippincott's Magazine, 1896).

Mervyn Kaufman, Father of Skyscrapers: A Biography of Louis Sullivan (Boston: Little, Brown, 1969).

Hugh Morrison, Louis Sullivan, Prophet of Modern Architecture (NY: W.W. Norton & Company, 2001), 141.

Louis Sullivan, "The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered" (Lippincott's Magazine, 1896).

Louis Sullivan, "The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered" (Lippincott's Magazine, 1896).

Louis Sullivan, "The Tall Office Building Artistically Considered" (Lippincott's Magazine, 1896).

Robert C. Twombly, Louis Sullivan: The Poetry of Architecture (NY: W.W. Norton & Company, 2000), 125.

Joseph Korom, The American Skyscraper, 1850-1940: a celebration of height (Boston: Branden Books, 2008), 209.

John F. Pile, A History of Interior Design (London: Laurence King Publishing, 2005), 298.

Joseph Korom, 209.

Meryle Secrest, Frank Lloyd Wright: a biography (IL: University of Chicago Press,…

Sources Used in Documents:

Bibliography

Kaufman, Mervyn. Father of Skyscrapers: A Biography of Louis Sullivan. Boston:

Little, Brown, 1969.

Korom, Joseph. The American Skyscraper, 1850-1940: a celebration of height. Boston:

Branden Books, 2008.

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