Nature in Shelley's Frankenstein Mary Thesis

Excerpt from Thesis :

The monster knows right from wrong and he choice is one of desperation. Victor never realizes the difference between right and wrong because it is not within his nature to do so.

Frankenstein will always be closely examined when it comes to matters of humanity because of its subject matter. Victor has every opportunity to do something good with his life and the most he can muster is achieving his own dreams of glory by attempting to recreate life. Despite his education and loving family, Victor swerves off the normal path and skids onto the freakish one. The monster he creates encompasses more goodness than he does but he cannot see this because he is just like the rest of humanity - unable to see beyond the monster's appearance. The monster tried everything within his power to remove himself from the freakish path that Victor placed him on and gain some sense of normalcy. It was in each character's nature to want specific things. Bloom maintains, "Frankenstein's hapless creature stands out as a sublime embodiment of heroic pathos. Though Frankenstein lacks the moral imagination to understand him, the daemon's appeal is to what is most compassionate in us" (Bloom). This is true because we recognize the inherent goodness in the monster and the inherent selfishness in Victor. The monster makes the effort that Victor never could and "For all his murderousness, the daimon remains the severe poet of the moral climate Mary Shelley created for him" (Bloom). Indeed, the harmless but hideous monster demonstrates how our destiny depends heavily upon our nature.

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. "An excerpt from a study of Frankenstein: or, the New Prometheus." Partisan Review. 1965. Gale Resource Database. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.comInformation Retrieved December 4, 2008.

Bloom on Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley." Bloom's Classic Critical Views. 2008. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Information Retrieved December 4, 2008. http://www.fofweb.com

Gould, Stephen. "The Monster's Human Nature." Natural History. 1994. EBSCO Resource Database. Information Retrieved December 4, 2008. http://search.epnet.com/

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books. 1981.

Scott, Sir Walter. "Remarks on Frankenstein." Blackwood's Edinburgh Magazine. 1818. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Information Retrieved December 4, 2008. http://www.fofweb.com

Brackett, Virginia. "Frankenstein." Companion to the British Novel: Beginnings through the 19th Century. 2006. Bloom's Literary…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Bloom, Harold. "An excerpt from a study of Frankenstein: or, the New Prometheus." Partisan Review. 1965. Gale Resource Database. http://www.infotrac.galegroup.comInformation Retrieved December 4, 2008.

Bloom on Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley." Bloom's Classic Critical Views. 2008. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Information Retrieved December 4, 2008. http://www.fofweb.com

Gould, Stephen. "The Monster's Human Nature." Natural History. 1994. EBSCO Resource Database. Information Retrieved December 4, 2008. http://search.epnet.com/

Shelley, Mary. Frankenstein. New York: Bantam Books. 1981.

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"Nature In Shelley's Frankenstein Mary", 04 December 2008, Accessed.29 May. 2020,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/nature-in-shelley-frankenstein-mary-26136

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