Open Society: Reforming Global Capitalism, Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

They resort to force to resolve International Disputes quickly. They also have a very 'black and white view of the world' in that they see elements as 'good or bad'; 'friend or enemy'.. It is therefore said that America is living in a Hobbesian state of Anarchy, where freedom can only be protected using brute force and strength (Kagan 2003 p. 4).

This has been clearly represented in America's war with Iraq and the 'Axis of Evil' that has been dominating American Foreign Policy discourse since 9/11. This contrasts with a Europe, which is seemingly committed to 'soft politics, wanting to build a world where economic strength means more than military strength. A world where international institutions and laws- such as those demonstrated by the United Nations, reign supreme over unilateralism and a state-centric view of the world. Finally Europeans wish to spread the core ideals of Democracy, Rule of Law; respect for Human Rights; the ideals of liberty; and the centrality of peace, (Manners 2002) resort to diplomacy rather than force. In short Europe is seemingly living in a Kantian world of 'perpetual peace', with no indication of wanting to extend their military capabilities, or return to the state they lived in before WWII (Politics and Power 2006).

Kagan believes after so many years of discontent that Europe finally had the opportunity to settle down and exist beyond the realms of power politics (Kagan 2003; pg. 12-13). With that, Europe feels that it is unnecessary to rearm and expand their military prospects.

This coupled with the physiological theory that the more power America gains, the more they feel they need to police the world, dealing with every dispute in an aggressive way, has left Europe militarily weak, and their diplomatic ideals undermined. Finally Kagan argues that the world order was in fact America's intention after WWII, as there was a general feeling that the European system was rotten and Europeans were incubators of their own wars (Kagan 2003; pg 70). Therefore Roosevelt felt he was doing the world a service by weakening them strategically. Unfortunately when America decided that it was in their interest for Europe to be strategically powerful again, Europe had already committed to supranational bodies and diplomacy and showed no interest in becoming a super power (Politics and Power 2006).

From there, it is clear that America's power skyrocketed, and has left Europe dwarfed by their mere size even though some people believe that the United States should not show its authority in the Middle East. "Europe cannot hope to spend as much on their defense budget as America does, not do they seem to have any inclination towards that. However Kagan neglects to see the positives in living in the 'post-modern paradise' (Kagan 2003-page 53) that seems to have been created by Europeans, as well as the positive impact that a more diplomatic peace-centric force can have on the world" (Politics and Power 2006). Unfortunately, showing authority is not the best idea for America because most countries like the Middle East take offense to it due to the foreign policy, which gives this country the right to interfere with foreign affairs. The United States' foreign policy on the principle of the rule…

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Kagan believes after so many years of discontent that Europe finally had the opportunity to settle down and exist beyond the realms of power politics (Kagan 2003; pg. 12-13). With that, Europe feels that it is unnecessary to rearm and expand their military prospects.

This coupled with the physiological theory that the more power America gains, the more they feel they need to police the world, dealing with every dispute in an aggressive way, has left Europe militarily weak, and their diplomatic ideals undermined. Finally Kagan argues that the world order was in fact America's intention after WWII, as there was a general feeling that the European system was rotten and Europeans were incubators of their own wars (Kagan 2003; pg 70). Therefore Roosevelt felt he was doing the world a service by weakening them strategically. Unfortunately when America decided that it was in their interest for Europe to be strategically powerful again, Europe had already committed to supranational bodies and diplomacy and showed no interest in becoming a super power (Politics and Power 2006).

From there, it is clear that America's power skyrocketed, and has left Europe dwarfed by their mere size even though some people believe that the United States should not show its authority in the Middle East. "Europe cannot hope to spend as much on their defense budget as America does, not do they seem to have any inclination towards that. However Kagan neglects to see the positives in living in the 'post-modern paradise' (Kagan 2003-page 53) that seems to have been created by Europeans, as well as the positive impact that a more diplomatic peace-centric force can have on the world" (Politics and Power 2006). Unfortunately, showing authority is not the best idea for America because most countries like the Middle East take offense to it due to the foreign policy, which gives this country the right to interfere with foreign affairs. The United States' foreign policy on the principle of the rule of power is highly overrated.

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https://www.paperdue.com/essay/open-society-reforming-global-capitalism-33080