Twain's Good Little Boy Twain's Term Paper

Length: 6 pages Sources: 5 Subject: Mythology - Religion Type: Term Paper Paper: #49671857 Related Topics: Shrek, Mark Twain, Cinderella, A Good Man Is Hard To Find
Excerpt from Term Paper :

" In it, he showed a poor boy and a rich boy (the Prince), who exchanged places and found that they each preferred to live in the life to which they had been born. Still, each learned from the other's life and the outcome was not what the Sunday School books had all written. The rich Prince "lived only a few years," but he lived them worthily.

In conclusion, Mark Twain was saying in his Story of the Good Little Boy, it is in a situation where one might expect to find reward that one finds punishment, and it is not how one's religion wants one to live that one finds reward and satisfaction. Also, the authorities in his Story did not exercise justice, so this was another disappointment for the reader, again coming to the conclusion that religion was not the answer to theme of this story and Twain taught it well.

Works Cited

Library of Congrress. "America's Story from America's Library." Website at: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/cgi-bin/page.cgi/jb/gilded.

PBS, "Andrew Carnegie: The Gilded Age." Website at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/carnegie/gildedage.html.

Twain, Mark. "Poor Little Stephen Girard," in Carleton's Popular Readings, Anna Randall-Diehl, ed., New York, 1879, 183-84.

Twain, Mark. The Gilded Age. New York: Classic Literature Library. 1873.

Twain, Mark. The Prince and the Pauper. London: Clays Ltd., St. Ives plc. 1996.

Sources Used in Documents:

Works Cited

Library of Congrress. "America's Story from America's Library." Website at: http://www.americaslibrary.gov/cgi-bin/page.cgi/jb/gilded.

PBS, "Andrew Carnegie: The Gilded Age." Website at http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/amex/carnegie/gildedage.html.

Twain, Mark. "Poor Little Stephen Girard," in Carleton's Popular Readings, Anna Randall-Diehl, ed., New York, 1879, 183-84.

Twain, Mark. The Gilded Age. New York: Classic Literature Library. 1873.


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