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American Studies Environment and Native

Words: 870 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 79499063

With the advent of Colombo on the American soil, things began to change as Philip J. Deloria asserts in her book Playing Indian (1999): "[T]he self-defining pairing of American truth with American freedom rests on the ability to wield power against Indians... while simultaneously drawing power from them." This is also the basic idea of Shari M. Huhndorf's Going Native: Indians in the American Cultural Imagination. "As white Americans became disenchanted with how American society was developing, they began to reference Indian people and culture as an answer to such problems of a modernizing America as capitalistic greed; alienating, sedentary life-style of the office worker; imperialistic aggressiveness; and racial and gender challenges to white male hegemony" (Barak, 2005).

The Indians progress was challenged by the so-called American School of ethnology. Therein Christianity became a tool in the American colonial project. The development of an ideology based in religion was made…… [Read More]

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American Ethnic Culture

Words: 3266 Length: 12 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 12368146

American Ethnic Culture

What is an American?

It is clear that Progressive era Americans from different backgrounds differentially defined precisely what being an American actually meant. Stephen Meyer wrote in the work entitled "Efforts at Americanization in the Industrial Workplace 1914-1921 that Americanization

"…involved the social and cultural assimilation of immigrants into the mainstream of American life…" but that the process was of the nature that was comprised of "a unique and distinctly American method for the resolution of a key industrial problem -- the problem of work-discipline and of the adjustment of new workers to the factory environment." (p.323)

The Americanization campaign is stated by Meyer to have been one that was "voluntary, benevolent and educational." (p.323) However, the programs emerged from within the factories and had negative connotations as well. It was not so much an issue of the diversity represented by the national or ethnic cultures but…… [Read More]

References

Gjerde, J. (1998) Major Problems in American Immigration and Ethnic History, 1998.

Takaki, R. (2008) A Different Mirror: A History of Multicultural America, 2008

Meyer, Stephen (nd) "Efforts at Americanization in the Industrial Workplace, 1914-1921"

Gerstle, Gary (2000) American Freedom, American Coercion: Immigrant Journeys in the Promised Land. Social Compass 47(1), 2000, 63-76. Online available at:  http://www.pineforge.com/healeystudy5/articles/Ch2/Americanfreedom , Americancoercion.pdf
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American History the Greatest Change

Words: 949 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 59402187

Even after the Emancipation Proclamation, the Supreme Court held that separate but equal was a legitimate stance under American law, essentially codifying human beings into different racial categories like a caste system, until Brown v. Board of Education in 1954. In short, America was a nation founded upon a paradox. It idealized freedom and personal choice, yet it also was based upon a system that did not allow a substantial percentage of the population to exercise that freedom and enjoy in their liberties.

The Civil Rights movement was so radical, because it demanded that the promise of American freedom finally be truly realized and granted to Black Americans, which America was unwilling to do, until African-Americans demanded their rights through this eloquent and articulate protest movement. Sadly, the damage of hundreds of years of slavery had taken their psychological and economic toll upon some Black Americans. One of the saddest…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Major Problems in American History Since 1945. Third Edition.

New York: Houghton Mifflin Company, 2000.
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American Dream of Egalitarianism

Words: 1532 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 41264984

America: A nation of paradoxes

America is a nation of paradoxes. On one hand, it is a nation that has symbolized freedom to many immigrants, as poignantly illustrated in Emma Lazarus' poem "The New Colossus," a poem included on the famed Statue of Liberty that greeted so many refugees as they strove to escape from Europe and avoid intolerable situations. The Lazarus poem proclaims the dawning a new America, free of class restrictions, which can offer prosperity even to the poorest new arrival. Yet federal policies in regards to African-Americans and Native Americans have been marked by injustice and prejudice. The American Dream of egalitarianism exists next to an ugly strain of racism that has run through the thread of American history since its inception.

Emma Lazarus' poem is perhaps the most explicit, famous rendition of the American dream: "Keep, ancient lands, your storied pomp... / Give me your tired,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Aldrich, Thomas Bailey. "Unguarded Gates." 1895. Print.

Hawk, Walter Echo. In the Courts of the Conqueror. Golden, Colorado: Fulcrum, 2010.

Hirschman, Charles. "Immigration and the American century." Demography (pre-2011) 42.4

(2005): 595-620. ABI/Inform Complete. Web. 19 Sep. 2014.
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Freedom of Association Facts the

Words: 1997 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 9132228

S. citizens. In this program designed to help young ones value the freedoms they currently experience:

according to Tyler Barnwell, stands for grievance, as in "to petition the government for a redress of grievances." which denotes religious freedom, Leslie Anne Hill, a Presbyterian, states:

"means you don't have to follow a certain religion." stands for freedom of assembly, Sherri Jones states is "the right to get together with other people peaceably, but not to disturb anyone." which is for freedom of speech, Stephanie Kenfield relates: "means you can say anything you want to say, and nobody can stop you or anything, but not bad words and stuff." stands for freedom of the press, Justin Jolly explains: "You could write and say anything you want on a piece of paper or in a newspaper or anything like that." "Getting a grasp..., 1994)

The ruling for The Alpha Epsilon Pi v. The…… [Read More]

References

 http://www.questia.com/ PM.qst?a=o&d=5000957726" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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American War for Independence Wars Are Fought

Words: 602 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19743910

American ar for Independence

ars are fought for many reasons, but freedom from oppression is by far the noblest. The Colonial States of America were British ruled until the year 1776, when the Declaration of Independence called for a complete withdrawal of the King's forces from the American colonies. (Decl. Of Indep. Entire.) The American ar for Independence was a revolutionary war by every definition of the word; the ruling British Empire was cast off permanently, the separation and equality of the various states was guaranteed, and sufficient support for the Constitution and the Bill of Rights completed the newly created United States of America.

The drafting of the Declaration of Independence created a precedent for freedom that the United States had been waiting for decades, and it addressed directly the oppressions beset upon the American colonies by King George III. The Articles of Confederation were a result of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Articles of Conf. 2.

Articles of Conf. 3.

Decl. Of Indep. Entire.

Knight, F. (2000). Retrieved from  http://www.historycooperative.org/journals/ahr/105.1/ah000103.html
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American Indian Movement

Words: 2030 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 81369738

American Indian Movement

The poorest people in America are the American Indians and it is also a fact that Indian reservations have unique laws that has made it a nation by itself within the United States. The modern movements focus on the American Indian reservations being empowered by self-determination. This is important for the economic, social and cultural improvement of the American Indians. It was with the Nixon administration that the welfare of the tribes became the focus of the government. The subsequent administrations encouraged the Indians to adapt to a policy of political and economic self-determination. Today many reservations have become economic hubs with tax and regulation havens for investment. Thus as of now the Mescalero and White Mountain Apaches "have become premier private managers of multiple-use forest resource economies." (Legters; Lyden, 1994)

However it must be stated that only during the eagan administration that there were major reports…… [Read More]

References

Bolt, Christine. (1990) "American Indian Policy and American Reform: Case Studies of the Campaign to Assimilate the American Indians" Routledge. Pages: 250, 298

 http://books.google.co.in/books?id=75UVAAAAIAAJ&pg=PA298&dq=american+indian+movement&hl=en&sa=X&ei=nj2IT92qCsWJrAeW-anrCg&ved=0CDMQ6AEwADge#v=onepage&q=american%20indian%20movement&f=false 

Fritz, Henry E. (1963) "The Movement for Indian Assimilation, 1860-1890." University of Pennsylvania Press: Philadelphia. Page Number: 15, 34, 56,138

 http://www.questia.com/ PM.qst?a=o&d=3054897" target="_blank" REL="NOFOLLOW">
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American Myths the Flag Is

Words: 1384 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 23422875

As Margaret Atwood points out, Americans have as much to be ashamed of as to be proud of.

When Barbara Kingsolver claims "The values we fought for and won there are best understood, I think, by oil companies," she refers to the way the American flag has been distorted. The issues the flag symbolizes, such as freedom and liberty, are myths for many people. As Kingsolver points out, the American flag has been used to justify many evils including wars like Vietnam and Iraq. Instead of delivering true freedom, liberty, and democracy, the American flag really brought economic dependence. Instead of associating the American flag with negativity, death, and intimidation, Kingsolver suggests that Americans reclaim it. The red stripes do not need to symbolize war. They can also symbolize "blood donated to the ed Cross."

The American flag is a flexible symbol that is often used in ways that manipulate…… [Read More]

References

Atwood, Margaret. "A Letter to America." Published on Friday, April 4, 2003 by the International Herald Tribune. Retrieved July 29, 2008 at  http://www.commondreams.org/views03/0404-07.htm 

Kingsolver, Barbara. "And Our Flag Was Still There." Published on Tuesday, September 25, 2001 in the San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved July 29, 2008 from Common Dreams at  http://www.commondreams.org/views01/0925-08.htm 

Streufert, Duane. "Evolution of the United States Flag." Evolution of the United States Flag. Retrieved July 29, 2008 at  http://www.usflag.org/history/flagevolution.html
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American Civil Liberties Union

Words: 2200 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 118782

American Civil Liberties Union

(Friend or Foe)

America was founded on the astute principles of democracy and the potential benefits of freedom it derives. America, unlike many of its foreign counterparts has long recognized the benefits of individual rights, freedoms and privileges and has fought to the death to protect them. Currently, America aims to spread these principles of democracy around the globe in an effort to create a better quality of life for all mankind. Even with these lofty and ambitious goals, America, on occasion fails to uphold these principles within its own borders. Too often, America has overlooked the problems prevalent within its own country while criticizing other nations about their own circumstances. Many of these overlooked issues including slavery, discrimination, women's rights and others have left an unfavorable image in American history. In such instances, the American Civil Liberties Union has become the beacon of hope for…… [Read More]

References

1) " American Civil Liberties Union." Social Welfare History Project. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 June 2011. .

2) "ACLU History | American Civil Liberties Union." American Civil Liberties Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 June 2011. .

3) "ACLU: Accomplishments." Action Center | American Civil Liberties Union. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 June 2011. .

4) "American Civil Liberties Union - New World Encyclopedia." Info:Main Page - New World Encyclopedia. N.p., n.d. Web. 21 June 2011.
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American Loyalists the American Revolution

Words: 1107 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 55756428

Therefore, for instance, the Stamp Act was justified through "granting and applying (of) certain stamp duties, and other duties, in the British colonies and plantations in America, towards further defraying the expenses of defending, protecting, and securing the same; and for amending such parts of the several acts of parliament relating to the trade and revenues of the said colonies and plantations, as direct the manner of determining and recovering the penalties and forfeitures therein mentioned"(the Stamp Act, 1765).

Taking these legislative manners into consideration, the opponents of the Loyalists considered that the issue of trade as a reason for maintaining the British rule was by no means a viable solution. More precisely, they argued that the lack of representation in the British Parliament should not allow the British to impose taxes they do not agree or vote upon. From this perspective, it can be said that the Loyalists had…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Borden, Morton, and Penn Borden. The American Tory. Prentice-Hall: Englewood Cliffs, NJ. 1972.

Jenkins, P. (1997). A history of the United States. New York: Palgrave.

The New World. An ocean away...Trade in the American colonies. N.d. 5 May 2008.  http://courses.wcupa.edu/wanko/LIT400/NewWorld/trade_in_the_american_colonies.htm 

The Stamp Act, Great Britain: Parliament, 1765. The Avalon Project at Yale Law School. 2005. 5 May 2008  http://www.yale.edu/lawweb/avalon/amerrev/parliament/stamp_act_1765.htm
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American Founding and Its Legacies

Words: 1003 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 6732336

Baltimore Advertiser, 18 Mar 1788)

(2) the second class was reported as comprised by "those descriptions of men who are certainly more numerous with us than in any other part of the globe. First, those men who are so wise as to discover that their ancestors and indeed all the rest of mankind were and are fools. We have a vast overproportion of these great men, who, when you tell them that from the earliest period at which mankind devoted their attention to social happiness, it has been their uniform judgment, that a government over governments cannot exist - that is two governments operating on the same individual - assume the smile of confidence, and tell you of two people travelling the same road - of a perfect and precise division of the duties of the individual." (No. 10 -- on the Preservation of Parties, Public Liberty Depends, 18 Mar…… [Read More]

References

The Anti-Federalist Papers (1788) Farmer No. 10. On the Preservation of Parties, Public Liberty Depends. 18 Mar 1788 )Baltimore Maryland Gazette. Retrieved from:  http://www.barefootsworld.net/antifederalist.html 

The Anti-Federalist vs. The Federalist. Polytechnic.org. (nd) *Based on the American Journey: A History of the United States by Goldfield, et al. Retrieved from:  http://faculty.polytechnic.org/gfeldmeth/chart.fed.pdf
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American Democracy

Words: 1874 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 30222095

American Democracy

A nation wherein the masses elect representatives to the government, thus ensuring the law is shaped by public opinion (so long as this opinion is Constitutional) is considered a republic. This was the aim of America's Founding Fathers. Democracy closely resembles a epublic; however, a key point of distinction between the two is the representatives. The founders were worried about citizens' criticism that they were assuming too much control themselves and hence, there was a need to prove to citizens that it wasn't the President, but the law, that governed the nation. Following the very ineffective attempt at enforcing the Articles of Confederation, the founders ultimately found success with the Constitution -- American history's most famous text -- which ensured federal power was limited to only matters included within the Constitution. Without the Constitution, the U.S. would be an absolute democracy with all citizens doing whatever they felt…… [Read More]

References

Adams, J. O. (2008). Why Our Founders Feared a Democracy. Retrieved from American Traditions:  http://www.americantraditions.org/Articles/Why%20Our%20Founders%20Feared%20a%20Democracy.htm 

Appelbaum, Y. (2015, October). America's Fragile Constitution. Retrieved from The Atlantic:  http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2015/10/our-fragile-constitution/403237/ 

Pease, H. (2010, June 25). The Founding Fathers Rejected Democracy. Retrieved from Liberty Under fire:  http://libertyunderfire.org/2010/06/the-founding-fathers-rejected-democracy/ 

Wandrei, K. (2016). What Features of the U.S. Constitution Had Distrust of a Democracy? Retrieved from Synonym:  http://classroom.synonym.com/features-constitution-distrust-democracy-20581.html
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American Revolution Motivations of the

Words: 717 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 41975285

Many colonists had come to the new world in search of a lifestyle infused with greater freedom. The colonists' ideas about government differed greatly from their English counterparts. hile the English still focused on the power of the monarchy, the colonists had been holding popular assemblies since 1763 ("The American Revolution: First Phase"). They began to believe in rights that they saw the English and their stationed guards as there to violate. In addition, they believed that they, not a country across the ocean, should have the right to control or at least have a say in the political decisions that would affect their lives.

In addition to these highly popularized economic and ideological causes of the revolution, social causes also added fuel to the fire of revolution. As the 1700s wore on, More and more Americans came from European countries other than England. As these people began to immigrate…… [Read More]

Works Cited

American Revolution," Microsoft® Encarta® Online Encyclopedia

http://encarta.msn.com© 1997-2008 Microsoft Corporation. All Rights Reserved.

The American Revolution: The First Phase." 2005. 9 December 2008. The American

Revolution.  http://www.americanrevolution.com/AmRevIntro.htm
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American Versions of Modernalisim the

Words: 1234 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 25063287



Some writers had been overwhelmed by the sudden changes brought by the Harlem Renaissance and they preferred writing about certain things which didn't involve it. Sometimes they chose to write about a place in the U.S. which had a special effect on them at some point of their lives.

3. Black people had not been the only ones struggling to receive credit for their writings during the 1920s, as it had been also hard for women to become appreciated in a majority of men writers. Despite having to fight the severe gender discrimination which existed during the period, many American women writers managed to become successful.

Bess Streeter Aldrich is one of the women who succeeded in getting a positive feed-back from a public that had not been accustomed with women writers. Aldrich's writing "A Lantern in Her Hand" had won her international recognition for having created a great literary…… [Read More]

Works cited:

Laurie Champion, Emmanuel S. Nelson, "American Women Writers, 1900-1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook," Greenwood Press, 2000.
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American Life Is All About the Fight

Words: 1371 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 17087246

American life is all about the fight towards becoming upwardly mobile and making life better. Ellen oster by Kaye Gibbons and the Narrative of the Life of rederick Douglass, an American Slave written by himself tell the story of struggle and hardship that leads to change and reflection. These two stories although differing in setting and protagonists, share the same level of pain that are universal regardless of race, gender, and age.

Both protagonists are bound by the chains of their existence. The differences are based on age and racial inequality. In terms of style and content, because the two novels were written during different time periods, they will have differences, especially in perspective since Douglass wrote it about himself where as Kaye Gibbons wrote about a made up character. In this essay these differences will be explained along with the universal themes that bring the two together.

Ellen oster…… [Read More]

Freedom is something both the protagonists of the two stories crave and need. Ellen needs to be free of her abusive father and finds it through his death and Douglass wants to be free of slavery and finds it through his escape. These pursuits not only illustrate the universal need for liberty and the pursuit of pleasure, but the human need to exist and exist well. It is through books such as these, that people can begin to understand things on a deeper level and realize the struggles everyone goes through at one point in their lives.

In conclusion the readings of Ellen Foster and Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave illustrate the plight and struggle of people in different times and periods. Ellen had to deal with poverty and abuse in 1970's American south and Douglass had to deal with existing during the period of American slavery. To compare the stories, one had to look at the subject matter. They were very different protagonists, one a black man, another a white girl, but they both determined to succeed and prevail against all odds and obstacles.

In regards to differences, the writing styles were the opposite of each other. One sought to create depth and mystery, the other to analyse and explain. Douglass wanted people to understand the plight of African-Americans were as Gibbons wanted to create a rich and deep character. Two great stories, two great characters, and one universal themese of suffering is what this essay offers.
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American Civil Right Movement Compare and Contrast

Words: 1837 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 56064499

American Civil ight Movement

Compare and contrast the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) and the Student Non-Violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) on the basis of their leadership, philosophy, and tactics.

Philosophy

Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) was a civil rights organization that was initiated by African-Americans in 1957 (Fairclough, 2001). The movement was primarily aimed at ending the segregation and discrimination against the black African population in the U.S. The core philosophy of SCLC revolved around to seek civil rights and economic justice for the people of Southern States having majority of African-Americans.

Student Non-violent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) actually aimed achieving same objectives as those of SCLC but through non-violent sit-in and defiance of segregated dining and lunch services. The core philosophy of SNCC was also eliminating segregation but the mission statement was narrower compared to SCLC.

Leadership

The most prominent leader of SCLC was Martin Luther King, Jr. Other prominent…… [Read More]

References

Dyson, M.E. (2009). April 4, 1968: Martin Luther King, Jr.'s Death and how it Changed America. Basic Books.

Fairclough, A. (2001). To Redeem the Soul of America: The Southern Christian Leadership Conference and Martin Luther King, Jr. University of Georgia Press.

Johnson & Johnson (2013). Annual Report & Proxy Statements: J&J. Retrieved from: [http://files.shareholder.com/downloads/JNJ/2770950354x0x644760/85FD0CFF-2305-4A02-8294-2E47D0F31850/JNJ2012annualreport.pdf]

Sundquist, J.L. (1968). Politics and Policy: The Eisenhower, Kennedy and Johnson Years. Brookings Institution Press.
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American History Slave Revolts Although

Words: 6354 Length: 20 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 54831518

Alexander Hamilton carried on an affair with the wife of "a notorious political schemer," Maria Reynolds. Andrew Jackson married Rachel Jackson before her divorce from Lewis Robards was finalized and therefore was accused of marrying a married woman. Jackson's opponent in 1828, John Quincy Adams, was in turn accused of "corrupt bargaining" during his term. Jackson also championed Margaret O'Neill Timberlake, who married his secretary of war, John Eaton. "Peggy O'Neill" was considered a woman of "questionable virtue," and as a result Martin Van Buren became Jackson's successor in the presidency. After the death of Jackson and Eaton, Peggy married a 19-year-old dance teacher (which raised eyebrows, as she was 59), who embezzled her money and ran off to Europe with her 17-year-old granddaughter.

Other scandals concerned Richard Mentor Johnson, who ran for vice president in 1836 with Martin Van Buren. He supposedly shot Tecumseh during the ar of 1812,…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Ferling, John. Adams vs. Jefferson: the tumultuous election of 1800. New York: Oxford University Press. 2004.
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American Flag After the Terrorist

Words: 642 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 78127813



When it is flown at half-staff because of a death or series of deaths, it should be first hoisted to the top of the pole for an instant and then lowered to halfway. The flag should be again raised to the peak before it is lowered for the day. "Half-staff" means lowering the flag to one-half the distance between the top and bottom of the staff. Crepe streamers may be affixed to spear heads or flagstaffs in a parade only by order of the President of the United States.

Here's one of the procedures least followed: When the flag is displayed in a way besides being flown from a staff, it should be displayed flat, whether indoors or out. When shown either horizontally or vertically against a wall, the union should be uppermost and to the flag's own right, that is, to the observer's left. When displayed in a window…… [Read More]

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American Revolution Was Modeled After Revolutions in

Words: 1999 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 69367832

American evolution Was Modeled After evolutions in France and England

The American quest for freedom, modeled after reform movements in England and France, has resulted in the most revered democratic society in the world. We are free of the religious and political tyranny that plagued Europe in the 18th Century and early colonialists would approve of our government in 2002.

While the American evolution and the quest for freedom was modeled after revolutions in France and England, the United States has done something that its European relatives admire - it achieved a stable democracy free of aristocratic and religious tyranny - and this was accomplished in a relatively bloodless fashion.

Our success would meet with accolades from European philosophers and historians including Jean-Jacques ousseau, Thomas Hobbes, John Locke, Thomas Paine and Francois Furet. However, our success has also many developing nations and Middle East nations to regard us as arrogant…… [Read More]

References

1. J. Rousseau, The Social Contract, 1762, Chapter 18

2. F. Furet, paraphrased from Interpreting The French Revolution, 1970

3. F. Bastiat "What is Seen and What is Not Seen," in Selected Essays, pp. 1-50.

4. J. Rousseau, The Social Contract, 1762, Chapter 18
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American & God's Dream the

Words: 2814 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 23912517

Marx's interpretation of Twentieth-Century Capitalism, as described by Miller, describes the changes in the American dream. The American dream was initially one linked to the idea of land ownership. Immigrants came from Europe, where land ownership had been a privilege of the wealthy. However, when America was relatively unsettled, almost anyone could theoretically come to America and claim land, and many people did just that. Of course, some of these early Americans did so in a grand way, traveling westward from the cities and establishing homesteads in the wilderness. The idea of home ownership, however, was not limited to those frontiersmen. Instead, only 100 years ago, someone could come to America and, because of the cheap price of land, afford to build his own home if he worked hard enough to do so. However, the nature of the home, itself, was different. Those homes were centers of production: at the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Medaille, John. The Vocation of Business: Social Justice in the Marketplace. New York:

Continuum International Publishing Group, 2007

Miller, Vincent Jude. Consuming Religion: Christian Faith and Practice in a Consumer Culture.

New York: Continuum International Publishing Group, 2004.
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American National Character History

Words: 3902 Length: 10 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 52485827

American National Character (history)

The Ongoing Search for an "American National Character"

This assignment asks the following pertinent and challenging questions: Is it possible to find trends amongst so much diversity? What characteristics are distinctly American, regardless of class, race, and background? What is problematic about making these generalizations and inheriting the culture? What have we inherited exactly? What problems arise with our ideals - and are we being honest with ourselves? Discuss individualism and the "American Dream." Are these goals realized and are they realistic? This paper seeks solid answers to these often elusive questions.

The search for a national character should be never-ending, and the pivotal part of the search that should be enlightening and enriching for the seeker of that knowledge may just be the inspiration from the books and authors springing into the seeker's mind along the way to discovery.

Who is presently engaged in a…… [Read More]

References

Bellah, Robert. Habits of the Heart: Individualism and Commitment in American Life.

New York: Harper & Row, 1985.

Cochran, Thomas Childs. Challenges to American Values: Society, Business, and Religion. New York: Oxford University Press, 1985.

Geertz, Clifford. The Interpretation of Cultures. New York: Basic Books, 1973.
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American Gospel the Book American

Words: 914 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Book Report Paper #: 63709592



Another drawback of the book is that it didn't have much perspective of what it has meant to be pluralistic or worldly in the context of the rest of the world. During the American Revolution, a country with no official religion was an odd idea. It was a general concept that the world had always been governed by a King by Grace of God, and in return protected God's true religion from heretics and blasphemers (esterlund, 2006).

In addition, the author did not discuss the major difference between the "divisive arguments about God and politics" in the late eighteenth century and today. Thus, without state support, religion flourished in the United States, and now as today is the most religious nation in the estern world. The strength of Americans' religious faith enlightens the determination of a "public religion" that even now continue to worry unbelievers and secular thinkers (esterlund, 2006).…… [Read More]

Works Cited

1. Pauline Maier. "American Gospel by Jon Meacham." Washington Post.

A www.washingtonpost.com.May 7, 2006

2. Deirdre Donahue. "American Gospel by Jon Meacham." USA TODAY.

A www.usatoday.com.
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American History in Their Considerations

Words: 953 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 3825697



Webster appears to be in agreement with Calhoun regarding the North's part in damaging the relationship between the North and the South. According to Webster however, the main culprit in this dynamic is the rhetoric of the abolition societies. While the author acknowledges that these societies include mostly honorable and just people who believe in their cause, he also holds that their rhetoric has become unacceptably emotional and their tactics, such as spreading anti-slavery literature to the South, essentially dishonorable. According to the author, such tactics ironically lead only to strengthen the Southern cause and increase enmity and violence.

Resolution

William Henry Seward believes that the abolishment of slavery is inevitable as the economy and humanitarian institutions grow. According to this author, the institution is simply an "accidental" institution that came into being as a result of a combination of certain factors at a certain time. As times are changing,…… [Read More]

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American History and Culture Contributes

Words: 2472 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 36047997

Nevertheless, there have been many decisions over the years that have tended to weaken the intent of the Framers. In 2001, in Zelman v. Simmons Harris the Supreme Court ruled that school voucher programs did not violate the establishment clause of the First Amendment. The decision represented a blow to the essentially secular nature of the American state and system. By allowing public money to be given to religious schools, the Supreme Court was permitting the violation of a more than two hundred year old principle. In reaching its decision, the Supreme Court chose to accept the argument that giving money to schools was not a case of advancing religion but rather one of who should have power over education - the state or individual parents.

Personal freedom was now being re-defined as something that included the right to government assistance if the government provided assistance in similar situations. Persons…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Bolick, Clint. "School Choice: Sunshine Replaces the Cloud." Cato Supreme Court Review 2001-2002. Ed. Robert a. Levy, James L. Swanson, and Timothy Lynch. Washington, DC: Cato Institute, 2002. 149-169.

Censer, Jack. "7 France, 1750-89." Press, Politics and the Public Sphere in Europe and North America, 1760-1820. Ed. Hannah Barker and Simon Burrows. Cambridge, England: Cambridge University Press, 2002. 159-178.

Champlin, Dell P., and Janet T. Knoedler. "American Prosperity and the "Race to the Bottom: " Why Won't the Media Ask the Right Questions?" Journal of Economic Issues 42.1 (2008): 133+.

Milner, Murray. Freaks, Geeks, and Cool Kids: American Teenagers, Schools, and the Culture of Consumption. New York: Routledge, 2004.
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American Democracy & the U S

Words: 2075 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65426903

"

Thus, the members of the Convention assumed that, although power was a necessary evil, it was also dangerous, especially when provided to the wrong person who might take advantage of this power for his own gain. In essence, the members attempted to compose a constitution that would insure effective power for the government when needed but that would also place reliable checks and safeguards on the use of that power. Once again, this aim can be traced back to Montesquieu's essay in which he states "to prevent the abuse of power, 'tis necessary that by the very disposition of things (that) power should be checked... " (Leone 37).

ut the members were also much too experienced in the ways of politics to take for granted that conscientious and moral men would always be elected to office. To them, human nature was universally fallible and only built-in safeguards could be…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Barzun, Jacques. From Dawn to Decadence: 500 Years of Western Cultural Life, 1500 to the Present. New York: HarperCollins, 2000.

The Constitution: An Enduring Document." U.S. Constitution: Drafting the Constitution. Internet. 2005. Accessed February 6, 2005.  http://www.usconstitution.com/DraftingtheConstitution.htm .

Leone, Bruno, Ed. The American Revolution: Opposing Viewpoints. San Diego, CA: Greenhaven Press, Inc., 1992.
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Americans in Muslim Countries American

Words: 951 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 59222068



A recent artifact that came as a product of this intercultural relationship is an article concerning an American woman's imprisonment -- which included beatings from the police and forcing her to sign false confessions -- simply for being seen eating in public with her male business partner. Even though the woman (who allowed her name to be printed only as "Yara," fearing retribution for telling her story) was wearing the traditional full-length gown and headscarf required of women when in public or in the company of men in Saudi Arabia,

she was approached by several men "with very long beards and white dresses" and told that what she was doing was "a great sin," a statement that reflects the disparity between the two cultures (Dhimmi Watch 2008). Ironically, the event took place at a Starbuck's, a place that has come to be a symbol of America's capitalism, freedom, and to…… [Read More]

Reference

Dhimmi Watch. (2008). "American woman jailed in Saudi Arabia for sitting with men at Satrbuck's." Reprinted from Fox News. Accessed 10 May 2009. http://www.jihadwatch.org/dhimmiwatch/archives/019844.php
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American Military Security The Dangers

Words: 1879 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 51015703

In the future, though, the influence the U.S. must wield over nations such as Pakistan that are Muslim yet strive to be part of the international community, is likely to be contingent upon the U.S.' recapitulation perceived moral authority as well as its ability to use economic and military carrots and sticks. American influence is also dependant upon the international population's own perceptions of the U.S. As well as these nation's national leaders' rhetorical compliance with U.S. demands for the curtailment and monitoring of terrorist activities. Thus to generate loyalty in the hearts of the people in nations such Pakistan, the U.S. must use soft, rather than hard power. And use this soft power more effectively and seem more morally upstanding a more judicious rather than aggressive use of national force seems essential.

orks Cited

Hess, Charles. "American Foreign Policy," Human Rights and Human elfare. Durham: Duke

University Press, 2004.…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Hess, Charles. "American Foreign Policy," Human Rights and Human Welfare. Durham: Duke

University Press, 2004.

Nye, Joseph S. Soft Power, the Means to Success in World Politics. London: PublicAffairs, Ltd.,

Nye, Joseph, "Soft Power and American Foreign Policy," Political Science Quarterly. 19. 2
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American Moderns Fashioning a New National Culture

Words: 1613 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 67791376

American Moderns: Fashioning a New National Culture

Literature and historians alike look to the past to define the present. In many ways, one can look at the defining moments in American history to understand the foundation in which today's culture exists. This paper asks one to examine the specific period of time after the Civil ar and how the men and women born of these decades until the First orld ar created a new American culture. This involves looking at the work of historians like Christine Stansell in order to gain a better understanding of the pillars and forces that shaped American culture at the time.

It is apparent that times were changing drastically from the Victorian era to the Modern era. People's morals and values were changing as writers and artists pushed the envelope and introduced new ideas into the mainstream. It can also be assumed that these "new…… [Read More]

Works Cited

"American Moderns." The Journal of American History 88, 3 (2001): 79.

Anderson, Sherwood. Winesburg, Ohio. Free Books Online.



Cohen, Patricia Cline. "Village Voices." The New York Times Online Book Review
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American Elections Have Become Undemocratic and Must Be Dramatically Overhauled

Words: 1735 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 24627789

American Elections Have ecome Undemocratic

The American electoral process has been criticized on several points. This paper addresses some, though not all, of the ways in which the American political process has been criticized. Starting with campaign finance and whether expensive advertising exerts an influence on the outcome of elections out of proportion to its importance, I discuss the difficulty faced by potential candidates in getting their names on ballots when they are not the candidate being promoted by either the Democrats or Republicans. I then address whether the idea of plurality in national elections is a rational one and conclude with a discussion of the Electoral College and whether its presence and influence in the outcome of the presidential race runs contrary to the expressed democratic spirit of the United States.

First, there is the issue of campaign finance. Essentially, the uncomfortable question is this: is the American system…… [Read More]

Bibliography

1. "Abolish the Electoral College" The Rest of Us.Org 2005. 29 April 2005

2. "Frequently Asked Questions." U.S. Electoral College 2005. National Archives & Records Administration 30 April 2005.

3. "Quick Answers to Candidate Questions" U.S. Federal Election Commission. 2005. 1 May 2005.

4. Kinsley, Michael, "Sitting Pretty." CNN Time September Edition CNN.com 29 April 2005
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American Political Philosophy

Words: 2528 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65411386

American Political Philosophy: epublicanism

Within this paper, the general theory of republicanism will be presented. The conceptualization of republicanism discussed within the paper as an American political philosophy will be based on The Federalist Papers written by Alexander Hamilton, John Jay and James Madison in 1787. Initially, a brief overview of relevant background information on The Federalist Papers will be provided. This will be followed by a discussion of the primary components of republicanism as set forth within the works of Hamilton, Jay and Madison. A summary and conclusions will then be provided.

Overview of The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers have been suggested as representing one of the most important writing in American political thought (Yarbrough, 1986). It represents a collection of 85 letters written by Hamilton, Jay and Madison under the pseudonym of Publius. The letters were written to the American public and were initially published in a…… [Read More]

References

Hamilton, A., Jay, J. & Madison, J. (1961). The Federalist papers. C. Rossiter (ed.). NY: New American Library.

Yarbrough, J. (1986). The Federalist. News for Teachers of Political Science, (Spring 1986). 7 June 2003: http://www.apsanet.org/CENnet/thisconstitution/yarbrough.cfm..
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American Government & Politics Today

Words: 696 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 3634546



When bureaucrats in a particular state see that a large segment of society is struggling with a particular rule or regulation, it may be time to address some changes to that rule. Texas and other states do this, but they are restricted somewhat in that federal regulations always supersede state regulations. Texas passes laws by presenting bills and having them move through the state legislature. If the bill gets enough votes, it is passed and becomes a law. However, it is very important that these bills are acceptable on the federal level, and that they comply with federal laws as well as what the state wants to accomplish. If they are not acceptable on a federal level, they cannot be laws in Texas, even if there were enough votes in that state to pass them. While some states have passed laws that go against what federal law states, it is…… [Read More]

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American Beliefs in Chapter Three

Words: 815 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 99178422



McElroy's thesis serves to isolate America from Europe, intellectually, in its development, and affirms America's sense of being a special nation in relation to the rest of the world. The vastness of the American wilderness, and its wide-open spaces that gave rise to the need for self-reliance also helps explain why modern European social welfare state institutions, like socialized medicine and generous pension plans, often meet with resistance in an America that is still in love with the ideal of individualism and hard work. Even in today's discussion regarding the status of illegal immigrants, on both sides of the debate, the willingness of desperate people to work for a mere pittance at jobs that Americans find too hard or poorly paying is often seen as admirable, rather than tragic, because hard work is so valued in American society.

McElroy's focus on the colonial period on of American history, however, neglects…… [Read More]

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American Government Course American Government

Words: 1740 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Journal Paper #: 6448180

It was during the same period that hostilities with the communist leadership culminated into the bombing of Libya, loggerheads with the Soviet Union and a stiff arms race with the U.S.S.R.

It is also significant to note that it was during the same time that he successfully engaged Mikhail Gorbachev who was then the Soviet General secretary and culminated into the signing of Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty that signaled the end in arms race and both countries agreed to decrease in nuclear weapons in their custody.

Upon ascending to presidency, Reagan was bent on introducing new political as well as economic dispensations radically. He advocated more for supply-side economics which saw him push for reduction of tax rates to speed up economic growth, money supply control to check inflation, reduction of regulation on the economy particularly business to encourage competitive and free-market free for all which as a matter…… [Read More]

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American Beliefs According to His

Words: 777 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 13810676

Also, it can cause Americans to turn a blind eye to the abuses of industry. If every American's lot is improved by success, then why, for example, should the laborers in the steel mills see their lives as poorer rather than better because of the success of their capitalist employers?

McElroy's analysis is convincing in light of the fact that unions are far less powerful in America than they are in Europe, and how even today, after America adopted some programs to help the indigent, so many successful American corporations like Wal-Mart are still able to avoid unionization, and celebrate the company's success as a gift to society and its employees, as well as the corporation's founders. It also explains the assumption that achievement as the main determinant of social rank in America, rather than birth. This belief is the result of the American creation of a more socially mobile…… [Read More]

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American Media Representation of Islam

Words: 3949 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 4285978

" (Iyengar, 2001) Lastly, the manner of presentation of a news story "significantly affects its ability to set the public agenda." (Behr and Iyengark 1985; Dearing and Rogers, 1996) Concluded is that: "In the current regime, American politics is almost exclusively a mediated experience. The role of the citizen ahs evolved from occasional foot soldier and activist to spectators. Those who seek public office invest heavily in efforts to shape news coverage of their candidacy. The returns from this investment provide them with leverage over public opinion, by setting the public agenda or by projecting a general impression of competent leadership..." (Iyengar, 2001)

The report published by the "ediaatters for America' website entitled: "According to aher, CBS's "Free Speech" is a isnomer" states that Bill aher, HBO's Real Time with Bill aher show host states that "CBS rejected his request to comment on religion for his planned "Free Speech" segment…… [Read More]

Miles, M.B., & Huberman, a.M. (1984). Qualitative data analysis, a sourcebook of new methods. Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

Miller, W.L., & Crabtree, B.F. (1992). Primary care research: A multimethod typology and qualitative road map. In B.F. Crabtree & W.L. Miller (Eds.), Doing qualitative research. Research methods for primary care (Vol. 3). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

The American Media Representation of Islam & Terrorism Post 9-11
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American Foreign Policy Theories it Has Been

Words: 1102 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 45870938

American Foreign Policy Theories

It has been said that all politics are local, meaning that whatever the issue, an individual always views it from the perspective of their own personal life. And since their personal life exists in a local environment, a person's view of a political issue is always clouded by local circumstances. oarke and Boyer, in International Politics on the World Stage assert that a nation's international policy can often be guided by their internal circumstances. In other words, a nation's foreign policy is often the result of domestic politics. This type of thinking has often been associated with what has been termed "realism," a theory that asserts international politics is shaped by conflicts between different nations caused by their domestic political circumstances. A newer type of realism, called "neorealism," actively attempts to shape world politics according a nation's internal needs, and has been enacted in many nations.…… [Read More]

References

Indyk, Martin, Kenneth Lieberthal, and Michael O'Hanlon. (2012). Bending History:

Barack Obama's Foreign Policy. Washington, DC: Brookings Institute. Print.

McCormack, James. (2010). American Foreign Policy and Process. Boston, MA:

Gengage. Print.
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American Association of People With Disabilities Aapd

Words: 1657 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 3499844

American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)

American Association of People with Disabilities

Agency Selected

The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD)

Purpose and structure

The American Association of People with Disabilities (AAPD) is the largest cross-disability membership organization in the nation. The agency serves multiple purposes, the most fundamental of which is advocacy. Established in 1995, the agency's original objectives were twofold: (1) to be a voice for and implement the policy goals of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) -- which had been enacted in 1990 -- and (2) to unite a wide diversity of people with disabilities into a community, bringing together the many disability-specific organizations that made up the landscape. The American Association of People with Disabilities holds that joining the diverse constituencies of the disability community -- people with physical disabilities, intellectual disabilities, developmental disabilities, sensory disabilities, psychiatric disabilities, and chronic health conditions --…… [Read More]

References

Affirmative Action, Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.(2009). Retrieved  http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/affirmative-action/ 

American Association of People with Disabilities Annual Report 2008-2009. Retrieved

 http://www.aapd.com/atf/cf/%7BEF7AB230-F758-4C6B-8CEA-916D9108BFEE%7D/AR%202008-09%20Book%2008%2013.pdf 

Buskey, F., and Pitts, E.M. (2009). Training subversives: The ethics of leadership preparation. Phi Delta Kappan, 91(3), 57-61. Retrieved July 7, 2011 from EBSC host,  http://web.ebscohost.com/
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American Meat Packing Corp 362F 3d 418 7TH

Words: 3196 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 19934518

American Meat Packing Corp., 362F.3d 418 (7th Cir. 2004).

On November 15, 2001, 350 workers at the American Meat Packing Corporation (AMPC) showed up for work and were told they had been terminated. Because they were not notified 60 days prior to termination, the Worker Adjustment and etraining Notification Act, U.S.C. § 2101-2109, the WAN Act, did not apply. The purpose of the 1989 WAN Act was to create a buffer for workers who anticipate mass layoffs or plant closings that have been unanticipated. Under the WAN Act, the 60 day notice of plant closings or any mass layoffs may be waived or reduced if a business closure is "caused by some sudden, dramatic, and unexpected action or condition outside the employer's control." 20 C.F.. § 639.9(b)(1).

The fundamental issue of this case is that of foreseeability. Business situations that are likely to cripple or close a firm may be…… [Read More]

Resources-Through Strategies

partnerships (8th ED), Thomson Retrieved  http://esl.rutgers.edu  / graduate_writing_program courses/academic_writing_II/media/b_paper.pdf

Internet sources assessed.

Lexus-Nexus

 http://openjurist.org/279/f3d/333/degruise-v-sprint-corporation   http://www.inderscience.com/www/pdf/ejim/06ejim-20477.pdf
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American Idiot Popular Music and Social Change

Words: 645 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 21369700

American Idiot

Popular Music and Social Change in the Present: Green Day's 'American Idiot' (2004)

Following the catalyzing events of September 11th, 2001, the United States would find itself deeply divided over the issues of terrorism, war and presidential politics. At the heart of this frequently impassioned and vitriolic debate would be the U.S.-led invasions of Afghanistan and Iraq as well as a far-reaching culture clash between two distinction American populations. The 2004 album by pop-punk trio Green Day, American Idiot, would be crafted with the intent of exploring these divisions. In the title track, Green Day would author an anthem that would become omnipresent in pop culture as the U.S. used falsified information to justify its invasion of Iraq.

"American Idiot" would serve both as a harsh critique of the war, of the presidency of George . Bush and of the violent, materialistic culture being fomented in the U.S.…… [Read More]

Works Cited:

Geek Stink Breath (GSB). (2012). American Idiot Song Meaning. Geekstinkbreath.net.

Wiebe, C. (2007). Walkn' With Green Day. Center for Parent/Youth Understanding.
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American Lit Definition of Modernism and Three

Words: 3585 Length: 13 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 58544512

American Lit

Definition of Modernism and Three Examples

Indeed, creating a true and solid definition of modernism is exceptionally difficult, and even most of the more scholarly critical accounts of the so-called modernist movement tend to divide the category into more or less two different movements, being what is known as "high modernism," which reflected the erudition and scholarly experimentalism of Eliot, Joyce, and Pound, and the so-called "low modernism" of later American practitioners, such as William Carlos Williams. Nonetheless, despite the problems of reification involved with such a task, I will attempt to invoke a definitions of at least some traits of modernism, as culled from the Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics:

First, [in modernism] "realization" had to replace description, so that instead of copying the external world the work could render it in an image insisting on its own forms of reality... [and] Second, the poets develop…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Preminger, Alex and Brogan T.V.F. The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics.

Princeton, NJ: Princeton UP, 1993.
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American Landscape

Words: 2041 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 57185420

American Landscape and Social Attitudes and Values

The relationship between American society and its natural environment has not only been one of rapid social change, it has also been subjected to radical and complex changes in attitudes towards nature. The extent of the this evolutionary change emanates from an earlier view of nature as a Garden of Eden to the contemporary view of nature as a servant of human technological growth

In the comparatively short span of our civilization the cycle of primitivism to industrialism has been compressed and laid bare for study. Less than a century divides the era when America was looked upon as a Garden of Eden or savage wilderness and the time when it took first place as the world's industrial giant. Probably no people have ever so quickly subdued their natural environment. www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=77844365" (Ekirch 6)

American attitudes towards nature have undergone a complex change in…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Angus, Ian. "Free Nature." Alternatives Journal Summer 1997: 18+.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=5000498362" "American Literature." The Columbia Encyclopedia. 6th ed. 2000.

A www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=8134619"

Ekirch, Arthur A. Man and Nature in America. New York: Columbia University Press, 1963.
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American Foreign Security Policies What

Words: 1788 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 36781574

But the U.S. must also set an example to the world on human rights, and that begins with a rejection of the kind of abuses that were carried out at Abu Ghraib in Iraq during the U.S. occupation of that sovereign nation.

orks Cited

Biden, Joseph. (2009). Biden Lays Out U.S. Foreign Policy Goals, Approaches. America.gov.

Retrieved Dec. 16, 2010, from http://www.america.gov.

Blanton, Shannon Lindsey. (2005). Foreign Policy in Transition? Human Rights, Democracy,

and U.S. Arms Exports. International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 49, 647-667.

Butler, Desmond. (2010). Lawmakers stretching out Russia nuke pact debate. The Seattle

Times. Retrieved Dec. 16, 2010, from http://seattletimes.nwsource.com.

Cardenas, Sonia. (2009). Human Rights in Latin America: A Politics of Terror and Hope.

Philadelphia, PA: University of Pennsylvania Press.

Hamid, Shadi, and Brooke, Steven. (2010). Promoting Democracy to Stop Terror, Revisited,

Policy Review, No. 59, 45-58.

McCain, John. (2010). National History and Universal Values: Prioritizing Human Rights…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Biden, Joseph. (2009). Biden Lays Out U.S. Foreign Policy Goals, Approaches. America.gov.

Retrieved Dec. 16, 2010, from  http://www.america.gov .

Blanton, Shannon Lindsey. (2005). Foreign Policy in Transition? Human Rights, Democracy,

and U.S. Arms Exports. International Studies Quarterly, Vol. 49, 647-667.
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American and Asian Music as

Words: 2888 Length: 9 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63747129

This, along with the older Psalter by trenhold and Hopkins, was the main influence of the Bay Psalm Book printed during 1640 in Massachusetts. This can be compared with the first musical influences on and compositions by Li Jinhui. The traditional forms were explored thoroughly before new ideas in music were explored.

Culturally, the new Americans at the time were deeply religious, following the Puritan tradition on which they based their way of life. Their music therefore reflected this tradition, and the earliest genres were mainly religious in nature. As such, the musical format was unaccompanied by musical instruments, as these were viewed as secular and therefore sinful. The same type of division can be seen in the later genres of Asian music, where Cantopop began to lose its popularity in the face of new and more trendy developments. In contrast, however, the Chinese does not have as clear a…… [Read More]

Sources

Faigin, Tom. "The Minstrel Show's Contribution to Folk Music." 2007.  http://www.jsfmusic.com/Uncle_Tom/Tom_Article6.html 

Wikipedia. "C-Pop." Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 2007.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C-pop 

Wikipedia. "K-Pop." Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 2007.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/K-pop 

Wikipedia. "Li Jinhui." Wikimedia Foundation, Inc. 2007.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Li_Jinhui
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American History Although the Early

Words: 857 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 75111246



British reactions to the colonies wavered throughout the colonial era, from the policy of salutary neglect to the tightened controls of King George III. The Crown faced a dilemma: to allow the colonies to develop thriving commercial enterprises in the hopes of a trickle-down benefit for Great Britain; or to tighten the leash on the colonial governments to demand more regular tax revenues. In light of the thriving colonial economies in Massachusetts, Virginia, and Maryland, King George III opted for the latter, imposing tariffs on the colonies. Britain's policies toward the New World colonies remained, therefore, primarily economic: the Stamp and Sugar Acts exemplify the Crown's interest not so much in the development of colonial culture as in the colonial economy.

Friction between English settlers and Native Americans also impacted the development of colonial life and of Crown policies. Infiltration into lands inhabited by the indigenous Americans led to numerous…… [Read More]

References

An Outline of American History." Embassy of the United States, Stockholm. Retrieved Sept 12, 2006 at http://stockholm.usembassy.gov/usis/history/chapter2.html

Colonial Settlement, 1600s-1763." The Library of Congress. Retrieved Sept 12, 2006 at  http://memory.loc.gov/learn/features/timeline/colonial/indians/indians.html 

From Revolution to Reconstruction." Retrieved Sept 12, 2006 at http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/H/1994/ch1_p9.htm
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American and Japanese Early Childhood

Words: 14069 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 63412707

Generally, it works by either giving a reward for an encouraged behavior, or taking something away for an undesirable behavior. y doing this, the patient often increases the good behaviors and uses the bad behaviors less often, although this conditioning may take awhile if the rewards and removals are not sufficient to entice the patient into doing better.

Existentialism is important to discuss here as well, and is often seen to be a very drastic way to examine human behavior. There are two types of existentialism. One is Atheistic Existentialism, and the other is Theistic Existentialism.

Atheistic existentialism has its basis in the statement that the entire cosmos is composed only of matter, and human beings see reality in two forms. Those forms are subjective and objective. People who believe in Atheistic Existentialism do not believe that anyone or anything specific made the world. They do not know whether it…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Adams, M.J., Treiman, R., & Pressley, M. (1998). Reading, writing, and literacy. In W. Damon (Ed.), Handbook of child psychology: Child psychology in practice, 4, 275-355. New York: Wiley.

Albertson, L., & Kagan, D. (1988). Dispositional stress, family environment, and class climate among college teachers. Journal of Research and Development in Education, 21(2), 55-61.

Amidon, E. (1980). Personal Teaching Style Questionnaire. Philadelphia: Temple University, College of Education.

Allison, Anne. (1996). Producing mothers. In Anne E. Imamura (Ed.), Re-imaging Japanese women (pp. 135-155). Berkeley: University of California Press.
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American History the Radicalism of

Words: 1813 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 65030947

" Indeed, in the "marriage bed of the beautiful Bertrande things now went well," presumably in sexual cohesion, but also, in reproduction as two daughters were born to them." key part of the Davis story was the trial, in which Arnaud was accused of being the imposter that indeed he was. This is in effect a sidebar to the story, and a sidebar to the issue of "different historians...using different types of evidence..." talk about the same things. On page 67, some 150 people had come to testify, but "forty-five people or more said that the prisoner was Arnaud...[and] about thirty to forty people said that the defendant was surely Martin Guerre." So, people who had seen history (the real Martin) had different views of whether this man on trial was him or not. Time casts shadows on the truth, just as it does on how the history of the…… [Read More]

References

Davis, Natalie Zemon. (1983). The Return of Martin Guerre. Cambridge: Harvard

Finlay, Robert. (1988). The Refashioning of Martin Guerre. The American Historical

Review, 93, 553-603.

Wood, Gordon S. (1991). The Radicalization of the American Revolution. New York:
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Freedom in Music in Sonny's

Words: 1124 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Thesis Paper #: 89013344

Sonny's brother wakes up and states, "Freedom lurked around us and I understood, at last, that he could help us to be free if we would listen, that he would never be free until we did" (47). Sonny was more free and living a life more true than his brother realized.

The transformation in Sonny's brother is dramatic. Duncan writes, "By the end of the story, the narrator has gained much more than an astute musical ear. He has learned . . . To listen" (Duncan). Throughout the story, Baldwin designates the act of listening as the linchpin of this moral tale; by focusing on an often-overlooked component of communication, this early Baldwin story illustrates how Brother, initially deaf to what Sonny calls "all that hatred and misery and love," opens his ears to his culture, his brother, and himself. and, through Brother's example, readers might also become more willing…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Baldwin, James. "Sonny's Blues." The Norton Anthology of Short

Fiction R.V. Cassill,

ed. W.

W. Norton and Company. New York: 1981. pp. 22-48.
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American Colonialism Opportunity in Colonial

Words: 1853 Length: 6 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 54310205

William Penn, a Quaker whose father had been an Admiral in the King's oyal Navy, was given a large piece of land as payment for a debt owed by the Crown to his father. Penn had suggested naming the new territory Sylvania, meaning wood, but the King added his surname, Penn, as a tribute to William's father (Uden). Penn considered his venture a "Holy Experiment" and sought to establish a society based on religious freedom and separation between religious and governmental authorities,

Under Penn's governorship, Pennsylvania became a safe haven for all persecuted religious groups like the Quakers. He instituted a ballot system that intended to allow all members of Pennsylvania to have an equal say in their own governance. Some of the provisions of equality and religious tolerance in the charter that he drafted for Pennsylvania would eventually be incorporated into other charters, including the U.S.

Constitution (Uden). Perhaps…… [Read More]

References

Bower, J. (1997) the Oxford Dictionary of World Religions

Fenton, E. (1969) a New History of the United States. Holt: New York.

Furlong, P., Margaret, S., Sharkey, D. (1966) America Yesterday: A New Nation (Revised). Sadlier: New York.

Nevins, a., Commager, H.S. (1992) a Pocket History of the United States 9th Ed.
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Freedoms Warriors Freedom's Warriors Office

Words: 591 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Assessment Paper #: 95843941

In the fierce amounts of fighting, Ferguson tried to break through the enemy position and was killed. This caused his men to lose faith and surrender.

However, the rebels could not maintain control of these forces. As they were fearful that Cornwallis could counterattack at any moment. This forced them to retreat into the mountains. The battle was significant, because it made Cornwallis abandon his strategy of pacifying the South. As a result, he moved his forces into Virginia (where he was surprised by Washington and the French). This led to his surrender and the subsequent peace treaty. (Bower)

These events are showing some of the parallels that the U.S. is facing with its War on Terror and dealing with non-traditional military forces. What causes their ranks to increase; is the approach that is taken by American officials in different regions of the world. In many cases, this has meant…… [Read More]

References

Bower, Stephen. Freedoms Warriors. U.S. Army Solider Support, 2005.
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American Terrorist Threat Since the Events of

Words: 2245 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 62943236

American Terrorist Threat

Since the events of September 11. 2001. Americans have had an increased concern about the possibility of more terrorism within United States borders. Although our government has made monumental efforts to prevent future attacks. A terrorist only has to slip through once. whereas our vigilance has to be 100% successful at all times. ecause of that fact it seems inevitable that eventually. we will see more terrorist attacks within the United States.

ecause we were attacked by people from outside our borders. many Americans tend to think of terrorist threats as in terms of outsiders who come here to do harm. Thus we have increased supervision at border entries. We know that this can work; an alert border guard between Washington state and Canada stopped a car and probably foiled a terrorist attack planned for Los Angeles.

However, some terrorist experts believe that we already have terrorist…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Emerson, Steven. American Jihad: The Terrorists Living Among Us. 2002. Free Press.

Government Accounting Office (GAO). 2002. "Key Elements to Unify Efforts are Underway but Uncertainty Remains." GAO-02-610. June 7.

Hoffman, Bruce. Inside Terrorism. 2000. New York: Columbia University Press.

Ledeen, Michael A. The War Against the Terror Masters: Why It Happened. Where We Are Now. How We'll Win. 2002. New York: St. Martin's Press.
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American Federal Government Procedural Due

Words: 825 Length: 2 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 55721417

They are occasionally informed too poorly to make an opinion, or are simply uninterested in some aspects of politics. Public opinion used to be measured through voting, letter writing, and demonstrating. However, those who write letter and demonstrate generally have views that are more extreme than those of the public (166-168). Thus, the public opinion poll was introduced. Examples of public opinion polling include President Barack Obama's approval rating, which is currently 68%, and the 72% that believe the U.S. will be "better off in four years" (Gallup). Public opinion polls are important because they "keep the public well informed," as well as keeping the public in touch with important shifts in public opinion" ("Are opinion polls useful?").

Using a random sampling method, the public opinion poll uses probability to reflect the views of the public. That is, by using a random selection of the population, the opinions of the…… [Read More]

Works Cited

Faxed Test.

Are Opinion Polls Useful?" American Historical Association. 25 January 2008. http://www.historians.org/projects/GIRoundtable/Polls/Polls5.htm

Gallup. "Obama Starts with 68% Job Approval." Gallup. 24 Jauary 2008. 25 January 2008.  http://www.gallup.com/Home.aspx
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American Terrorism for Many People

Words: 14357 Length: 50 Pages Document Type: Research Paper Paper #: 86656733



The USA Patriot Act: This was a law that was passed after September 11th. It is giving the police and intelligence officials the power to go after terrorists organizations easier. As it lifted various Constitutional protections when investigating these offenses.

Counter Terrorism: These are the activities that: federal, state and local officials are taking to prevent future terrorist attacks.

Weapons of Mass Destruction (WMD): These are weapons designed to inflict large amounts of casualties. These include: chemical, radiological, biological and nuclear.

These different terms are important, because they will help to avoid confusion and will focus the reader on understanding the overall scope of the problem.

Limitations of the Study

The limitations of the study are that the information we are presenting, could be pointing out a number of different problems. Yet, beneath the surface they are failing to identify possible changes that could have already been implemented by federal…… [Read More]

Bibliography

39% Say Government. (2011). Rasmussen Reports. Retrieved from:  http://www.rasmussenreports.com/public_content/politics/general_politics/march_2011/39_say_government_not_focusing_enough_on_threat_of_domestic_islamic_terrorism 

Al Shabaab American Recruits. (2010). ADL. Retrieved from:  http://www.adl.org/main_Terrorism/al_shabaab_american_recruits.htm 

Comparative Analysis. (2011). Business Dictionary. Retrieved from:  http://www.businessdictionary.com/definition/comparative-analysis.html 

Jose Padilla. (2009). New York Times. Retrieved from:  http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/people/p/jose_padilla/index.html
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American History During the 1940s America Had

Words: 1426 Length: 5 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 68012031

American History

During the 1940s, America had just experienced the onslaught of World War II. After massive fighting against the Axis power nations (Germany, Italy, and Japan), America, along with its allies in the war, was able to conclude the conflict by deciding to drop the atomic bomb in Japan. The war ended with the Axis power conceding defeat, and America went on to rehabilitate its nation after the war. The rehabilitation of America as a nation weary of possible atrocities among nations in the world is twofold. After the war, America experienced a resurgence in economic growth, primarily brought about by the development of new technologies that spurred the country's commercial market. Furthermore, the growth of new technologies and manufacturing industry in America encouraged social mobility, enabling the middle class society to increase in number, narrowing the gap between the rich and the poor. Thus, the technological revolution and…… [Read More]

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American History - Roe V

Words: 2441 Length: 8 Pages Document Type: Research Proposal Paper #: 35420957



Furthermore, the Supreme Court (and the Texas district court also) relied on a judicial invention introduced in the earlier Griswold and Eisenstadt decisions: namely, the penumbra of privacy that was said to "emanate" from the Fourteenth Amendment to give rise in a fundamental right of privacy despite the fact that the notion of personal privacy is not mentioned at all in the Constitution. Certainly, the Roe decision was justified on general principles of justice, equality, fairness, and ordinary definitions of private affairs; but from a technical legal argument perspective, many commentators have suggested that it was a case of the Court fitting the Constitution to the law rather than conforming the latter to the former.

Conclusion:

Regardless of the any technical criticism in the legal analysis of the basis for the Supreme Court's decision in Roe, it remains the right and moral decision on the issue.

Certainly, room exists for…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Abrams, Natalie, Buckner, Michael, D. A Clinical Textbook and Reference for the Health Care Professions. (Cambridge: MIT Press, 1999).

Dershowitz, Alan, M. Shouting Fire: Civil Liberties in a Turbulent Age. (New York: Little Brown & Co, 2002).

Friedman, Laurence, M. A History of American Law. (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2005).

Hall, Kermit, L. The Oxford Companion to the Supreme Court of the United States. (New York: Oxford University Press, 1992).
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American Cinema Patterns of Sexual

Words: 2282 Length: 7 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 15468208

The director makes this point very clearly in the scene where David and Dianna win some money.

They tumble among the bills, consummating their love for money as much as, or more so than, their love for each other. The scene is quite remarkable even beyond the basic idea of sex literally on top of money. Lyne spends significant amounts of time exploring the cash-filled crevices of his stars. While certainly a cinematic first, this union of love and money is a hollow pleasure.

The above quote also emphasizes the attitude projected by the film, which is a reflection of the contemporary world, where money and sex and power are closely associated. In a sense the film also points to another problematic aspect of the modern world; that the value of money is regarded above all else - including love and human relationships. The entire film is built around an…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Berardinelli, J. Indecent Proposal. Retrieved March 9, 2005. Web site: http://movie-reviews.colossus.net/movies/i/indecent.html

Dirks, T. Deliverance (1972). Retrieved March 9, 2005 from Filmsite Org. Web site:  http://www.filmsite.org/deli.html 

Howe, D. 'Midnight Cowboy' (R) (1994) Retrieved march 8, 2005 from the Washington Post. Web site:  http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/style/longterm/movies/videos/midnightcowboyrhowe_a0b04a.htm 

Koller B. Midnight Cowboy (1969) Retrieved March 7, 2005. Web site:  http://us.imdb.com/Reviews/131/13153
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American Revolution American Victory and

Words: 937 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 2051246

In the Continental Army was not just a force that was motivated by its service to a united cause, but by the democratic impulses that differentiated this from the British system of nobility and military rank. As a result, the dedication to cause elicited from the Continental Army solider was inherently more driven by the theoretical opportunities to follow victory. Certainly, for those who took part in the struggle to remove the British from American soil, there would also be an adoption of the view of this as a personal homeland now imposed upon by occupation.

To an extent, this motive may be said to be a greater assurance of eventual victory than military might. In the case of the American war for Independence, the better armed and more resource-wealthy British Imperial forces would be worn down by a commitment to what the Continental Army and militias alike saw as…… [Read More]

Such alliances suggested the more widespread implications of an American victory. While we may stop short of arguing that Britain lost a war -- particularly because many conditions suggest its defeat was inevitable regardless of military tactic -- it may be reasonable to argue that this signaled the beginning of the end of a colonial system which had sustained all European monarchies to this juncture. The power of the British Crown had been tarnished, but the initiation of the Industrial Revolution in both the United States and throughout Europe during the next century was fully dismantle its structural relevance. The type of wholesale occupation through which it had conducted its international presence would no longer be possible for Great Britain on the scale that had been achieved prior to American Independence.

Ultimately though, it seems appropriate to acknowledge these events first and foremost as a victory for the aristocratic leaders of the American rebellion and the working class enlisted men alongside whom they fought. Without too greatly idealizing this relationship, it may be acknowledged as a root to Americas socioeconomic identity today.

Martin, J.K. & Lender, M.E. (2006). A Respectable Army: The Military Origins of the Republic, 1763-1789. Harlan Davidson, Inc.
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American Citizens Should Have the

Words: 1408 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Term Paper Paper #: 94692545

Gun owners should be forced to lock their guns in order to limit the access of kids to them, instead of limiting the gun ownership drastically.

Another argument in favor of bearing arms is that this is a right granted by the Second Amendment, which states that "A well regulated Militia, being necessary for the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed." So, people should be allowed to keep and bear arms as a measure of self-protection. As a well-organized police force is needed to maintain security, so is the right of citizens to bear arms needed to protect themselves. (rent, 2000)

Individuals should have the right to bare guns because such a measure permits them to defend themselves and not to become victims of attackers that take advantage of their weakness. Instead of being a measure that…… [Read More]

Bibliography

Lott, John R., More guns, less crime, in Taking Sides, edited by McKenna, George and Feingold, Stanley, published by McGraw-Hill/Dushkin, Iowa, 2005.

The main point of the article is that access to guns has a role of deterring crime and that allowing citizens to bare arms is absolutely necessary so that citizens can defend themselves.

This source relates to my other sources because it also states that allowing citizens to bare arms is benefic for reducing crime. I would like to find more articles related to the traditional values of holding a gun in the American society.

Brent, Parker, Do individuals have the right to bear arms, April 2000, available at  http://www.rense.com/general/abeararms.htm .
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American Government the Five Main

Words: 1237 Length: 4 Pages Document Type: Essay Paper #: 91599353

It separates the various forms of government and does not allow one to become more powerful than another, and it ensures that laws are created fairly, that justice is fair, and that the President does not gain too much power. Essentially, it is the backbone of our Democracy, and that assures our freedom and the public good.

Critics of the Constitution and its support of the public good believe that the laws can promote gridlock in legislation, and that it can make it easier for government leaders to not take responsibility for problems. However, the framers of the Constitution had the citizens in mind, and they formed it to create a Democratic country with the good of the public as a foremost concern.

The Virginia Plan was a plan favored by James Madison, and it had three branches, legislative, executive, and judicial. The legislature chose the executive and judicial branches,…… [Read More]

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American History -- Thomas Paine Modern Examination

Words: 805 Length: 3 Pages Document Type: Article Review Paper #: 41507503

American History -- Thomas Paine

Modern examination of the roots that birthed this nation illuminates with steadfast clarity the manner, importance, and weight of the movements of the past. Bernard Bailyn knows this firsthand; in his analysis of Common Sense, he not only studies the historiography of Thomas Paine's revolutionary pamphlet, but by placing himself in retro-active historical context, he is able to find age-old movement in the piece to share with the political historian today. Inside the Englishman's pamphlet on logic and politics, he finds not just a call for revolution, but instead a greater amass of the smaller pleas for transition that, when united under the banner of intellectual outreach and historical debate, reaffirms the common sense Pain purported two hundred and thirty years ago.

In The Most Uncommon Pamphlet of the Revolution: Common Sense, Bailyn supports the widely held belief that Thomas Paine's pamphlet that urged America…… [Read More]