American Versions of Modernalisim the Research Proposal

Excerpt from Research Proposal :



Some writers had been overwhelmed by the sudden changes brought by the Harlem Renaissance and they preferred writing about certain things which didn't involve it. Sometimes they chose to write about a place in the U.S. which had a special effect on them at some point of their lives.

3. Black people had not been the only ones struggling to receive credit for their writings during the 1920s, as it had been also hard for women to become appreciated in a majority of men writers. Despite having to fight the severe gender discrimination which existed during the period, many American women writers managed to become successful.

Bess Streeter Aldrich is one of the women who succeeded in getting a positive feed-back from a public that had not been accustomed with women writers. Aldrich's writing "A Lantern in Her Hand" had won her international recognition for having created a great literary work.

"A Lantern in Her Hand" is the story of Abbie Deal, who proves to possess an incredible amount of courage. Because of her courage she manages to overcome several perils that she encounters. Aldrich had most probably meant to make readers that have also gone through unfortunate events identify themselves with Abbie's character. Abbie constantly wants to evade all the events that a normal woman during the period has to go through. She rejects the thought of having to live a normal life, and, instead, she wishes to accomplish her dreams. Sadly, she passes near every opportunity that comes by and later regrets her lack of action. Abie is meant to prove to people that they should appreciate the good things in life and live for the moment.

Albrich's work clearly presents most of the elements which had been important during the period and "A Lantern in Her Hand" can easily be counted as one of the best U.S. writings from the period.

4. A lot of major events have happened in the first half of the 20th century, and the literary world has produced numerous works inspired by them. In the context of a modern radically changing society, John Reed had been furious that the American authorities did not do much to promote free-speech, and, that they didn't do much to support minorities or people in need of assistance.

Writers like Reed preferred to use events from outside the U.S. In order to express himself better. The rest of the world had had several notable incidents during the time and some Americans had been acquainted with the latest news. Reed felt that Americans, unlike other nations, did not care much about the notion of freedom and how it was applied in their home country.

Reed disliked the fact that the American society disregarded the minorities and those that wanted to make a change generally speaking. Americans were easy to manipulate, and, once having gotten their attention, the government could make use of them like puppets. U.S. citizens generally saw radical changes as being damaging to their society. Moreover, the people of the time considered black people to be guilty for nearly any misfortune which happened. The authorities harshly punished anyone bold enough to organize rebellions or to speak against the state.

The U.S. has been renowned worldwide for being home to free-speech and to freedom. However, the conditions there had been different in the past, from what people heard, with free-speech being an unattainable dream for a long time.

Works cited:

Laurie Champion, Emmanuel S. Nelson, "American Women Writers, 1900-1945: A Bio-Bibliographical Critical Sourcebook," Greenwood Press, 2000.

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