Death Of A Salesman By Research Paper

Length: 5 pages Sources: 5 Subject: Literature Type: Research Paper Paper: #35817863 Related Topics: Arthur Miller, A Good Man Is Hard To Find, False Memories, Life Coaching
Excerpt from Research Paper :



Biff, by no means, was him a lazy bum, he had many different jobs before, but did not stay long at any of them, so he was not a dependent user who would wait for others to provide for him, he actually worked. The perception of Willy on Beff's job is evident when he speaks about Biff's recent job as a farm hand with disdain. He demeans the job without caring that it was a means where he would make an honest living. It indicates that no matter the job he would have picked for himself, Willy would not have supported him unless it was the one that brought the glory and reverence to the Lamon family name (Magil 1365-1368).

Thematic issues like father-son relationships that the author pursues in his writing: Biff and Will's relationship is not only representative of how fathers plan and map out their child's life, without pausing to consider the fact that the

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Narcissism exhibited by Willy also brings to the fore another aspect the writer dives into, and that is how all of the characters lied and even went to very extreme lengths, to make sure that Willy is content and happy in a delusion. In the final scene, Biff has an outburst that brings Willy to the reality that; they are past their glory days, "Pops you and me are dime a dozen, do not expect me to bring back prizes those days are gone," that is the most pivotal statement made in the entire play. Willy is brought down from the fictitious paradise he built in his delusion, and he realizes that it was him to blame for Biff's anger towards him since; the incident in Boston and so for the first time he faced the truth, the honest truth, which proved hard to bear and so he commited suicide.

References

Bender, David, "Arthur Miller," San Diego CA: Greenhaven Press 1997, 5-6

Corrigan, Robert, "A Collection of Critical Esays" Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice hall, 1969 98-107

Miller, Arthur "Death of a salesman" New York, Penguins 1949, 10-13

Magil, Frank "Death of a Salesman: Master plots" Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Salem, 1976. 1365-1368

Zeineddine, Nada "Willy Loman's Illusions" San Diego CA; Greenhaven Press,…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Bender, David, "Arthur Miller," San Diego CA: Greenhaven Press 1997, 5-6

Corrigan, Robert, "A Collection of Critical Esays" Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice hall, 1969 98-107

Miller, Arthur "Death of a salesman" New York, Penguins 1949, 10-13

Magil, Frank "Death of a Salesman: Master plots" Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Salem, 1976. 1365-1368


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