Physiology - How a Woman's Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

In an acute shock situation, the body shuts down many of its functions in the interest of addressing the patient's most-urgent problem.

In addition to reduced kidney function, the patient's brain function slows down; she may appear lethargic, have difficulty talking, and eventually lapse into a coma. This is due to the body's diverting blood supply from the brain, which typically takes 20% of oxygen and nutrition, to other areas which require it most.

The woman's broken cells will put out markers for tissue injury: in the case of the liver, the SGPT and SGOT enzymes will be elevated, indicating liver damage. General enzyme levels indicating systemic injury will also climb, including myoglobin, various tissue factor antigens, endotoxins and a series of other enzymes which are released upon cell destruction. If the initial concern was the spleen, kidney and liver, it may also make sense for the attending ER physician to check pancreatic, stomach, heart- and lung-specific enzymes to monitor additional damage.

As mentioned previously, the woman's response can result in actions deleterious to her prognosis. These include:

release of too many cytokines at one time can cause generalized inflammation, breathing difficulties, and a faster bleeding-out.

The release of too many platelets at one time depletes the body's reservoir, and makes chances of further bleeding increase.

The rush of blood to the woman's abdomen can promote faster bleeding, particularly in this case to the spleen.

The infection response of T-cells is not needed by the body in the early, acute stages of trauma, although they can be beneficial in a later period. Their appearance lends to increases in inflammation, which can speed liquid losses.

Conclusion

The woman's natural protection methods both help and hurt her prognosis, perhaps because our bodies' designs were completed prior to the invention of the Emergency Room. By lowering metabolism and, to the extent possible, attempting to staunch blood flow at the injured sites, the patient undergoes a series of protective measures which can improve her chance of survival.

Bibliography

Dubois, C., Panicot-Dubois, L., Gainor, J.F., Furie, B.C. And Furie, B. "Thrombin-initiated platelet activation in vivo is vWF independent during thrombus formation in a laser injury model." Journal of Clinical Investigation (2007): 953-960.

Gando, S., Nanzaki, S. And Kemmotsu, O. "Coagulofibrinolytic Changes after Isolated Head Injury Are Not Different from Those in Trauma Patients without Head Injury." The Journal of Trauma (1999): 1070-1076.

V.E. Mack, M.D. McCarter, H.A. Naama, S.E. Calvano and J.M. Daly. "Dominance of T-helper 2-type cytokines after severe injury." Archives of Surgery (1996): n.p.

Physiology - How a Woman's Various Organs and Systems Respond to Trauma

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Bibliography

Dubois, C., Panicot-Dubois, L., Gainor, J.F., Furie, B.C. And Furie, B. "Thrombin-initiated platelet activation in vivo is vWF independent during thrombus formation in a laser injury model." Journal of Clinical Investigation (2007): 953-960.

Gando, S., Nanzaki, S. And Kemmotsu, O. "Coagulofibrinolytic Changes after Isolated Head Injury Are Not Different from Those in Trauma Patients without Head Injury." The Journal of Trauma (1999): 1070-1076.

V.E. Mack, M.D. McCarter, H.A. Naama, S.E. Calvano and J.M. Daly. "Dominance of T-helper 2-type cytokines after severe injury." Archives of Surgery (1996): n.p.

Physiology - How a Woman's Various Organs and Systems Respond to Trauma

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