Teaching Disadvantaged Adults There Are Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

As a result they are often excluded from the mainstream and from being productive members of society.

I feel that it is not only ethically and morally important to help these individuals but that it also makes economic and social sense to assist those who are disadvantaged to receive a better education and advance their potential in life.

I also believe that we should be careful to consider the fact that adult education is an area that requires a very different approach and involves different modes of understanding, as well as the use of appropriate techniques, when dealing with the various categories of disadvantaged adult. For example, in terms of those adults who are disadvantaged with regard to education backlogs, one has to realize that they often face a number of unique and specific problems; such as the fact that many will have families, children and work commitments, which make focusing on education problematic.

One has also to be very sensitive to the context of their situations and the reason for their disadvantages. In other words, adult education is in itself an area that requires sensitivity and understanding and this is increased when one teaches the adult who has certain disadvantages. The view put forward by Moore and Kearsley is useful in this regard. In a study entitled, Distance Education: A System's View, the author's point out that the educator has to make use of different approaches when dealing with the disadvantaged adult student. This study found, for example, that adult learners are often more highly motivated and also have a very different set of learning expectations than the ordinary student. This can include a greater inclination to ask questions and interpret the facts. (Moore and Kearsley, 1996). Adult learners also show a marked tendency to be more independent and in control of any learning situation. The study also points out the role that the family and commitments play in adult educations as well as aspects such as finance. These are all aspects that have to be taken into account and these issues are compounded when dealing with adults who have various disadvantages.

Taking the above discussion into account, my philosophy about teaching disadvantaged adults could be summarized as follows. In the first place I believe that society and educators have a duty to help those who are disadvantaged. The necessity of a good education is central to this view and those who do not have an adequate education are often isolated and marginalized in our modern society. Therefore I believe that because an individual is disadvantaged it does not mean that he or she should not have the same chances and opportunities as others who are not disadvantaged. Secondly, the educator who deals with the disadvantaged adult must be cognisant of and understand the reasons and the possible social context for the individual's disadvantage. This sensitivity is important in finding appropriate teaching techniques and methods that can help the individual in the learning process.

Finally I believe that there is an important social aspect to the need to teach disadvantaged adults. There are many adults who could be contributing more to the advancement of society but who are unable to do so because of disadvantages. In other words they could be contributing to society more effectively if they had the necessary education. It is therefore incumbent on the educator to ensure that those adults with potential should not be neglected because of disadvantages that they have experienced.

References

Moore, M.G., & Kearsley, G. (1996). Distance Education: A System's View.

Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Motivating Disadvantaged Adult Learners. Retrieved July 5, 2009 from http://ujop.cuni.cz/page/en/dalsi/presentations/MoDAL-basic%20idea.ppt.

Incidental teaching. Retrieved July 5, 2009 from Incidental Teaching.

http://www.mcesa.k12.mi.us/Documents/AI%20Tip%20sheets/Incidental%20teaching%20tip%20sheet.pdf

What is Incidental Teaching? Retrieved July 5, 2009 from http://www.autismnetwork.org/modules/academic/incidental/lecture01.html#topic1

Sources Used in Document:

References

Moore, M.G., & Kearsley, G. (1996). Distance Education: A System's View.

Belmont, CA: Wadsworth.

Motivating Disadvantaged Adult Learners. Retrieved July 5, 2009 from http://ujop.cuni.cz/page/en/dalsi/presentations/MoDAL-basic%20idea.ppt.

Incidental teaching. Retrieved July 5, 2009 from Incidental Teaching.

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