Life Lessons In Shelley's Frankenstein Thesis

Length: 5 pages Sources: 10 Subject: Literature Type: Thesis Paper: #2721287 Related Topics: Frankenstein, End Of Life, Life, Nature Vs Nurture
Excerpt from Thesis :

He notes that at the time of the novel's publication, there was growing concern and distrust for unregulated scientific experimentation. He claims that these beliefs "so successfully dominated the cultural sphere that the word "Frankenstein" was soon used to refer to the creature created by the scientist rather than the scientist himself. Frankenstein, therefore, became the monstrous and supernatural offspring of the practices of science" (Willis 236). Mellor suggests that Frankenstein was the first creature that was created by a single man and Shelley created her myth "single-handedly" (Mellor 38). Victor teaches us some valuable lessons and the most important might be to never forget the

...

Victor never considered that his creation would be hideous and that oversight ruined everything for him and the creature. Victor's desire to know more lead to more destruction than he could have ever imagined.

Work Cited

Berry Laura. The Child, the State, and the Victorian Novel. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. 1999.

Brackett, Virginia. "Frankenstein." Companion to the British Novel: Beginnings through the

19th Century. 2006. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Information Retrieved April 29,

2009. http://www.fofweb.com

Hoobler, Dorothy and Thomas. The Monsters: Mary Shelley and the Curse of Frankenstein. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2006.

Garrett, Martin. Mary Shelley. New York: Oxford University Press. 2002.

Gould, Stephen. "The Monster's Human Nature." Natural History. 1994. EBSCO Resource

Database. Information Retrieved April 29, 2009.

Sources Used in Documents:

Work Cited

Berry Laura. The Child, the State, and the Victorian Novel. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. 1999.

Brackett, Virginia. "Frankenstein." Companion to the British Novel: Beginnings through the

19th Century. 2006. Bloom's Literary Reference Online. Information Retrieved April 29,

2009. http://www.fofweb.com
Database. Information Retrieved April 29, 2009. <http://search.epnet.com/
<http://www.fofweb.com>


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