Crash of Japan Airlines Flight Case Study

Excerpt from Case Study :

The Boeing 747-300 model was designed to hold 600 passengers. But the founder of America's Flight Safety foundation, Jerome Lederer, commented that evacuation of such numbers in the event of disaster would be troublesome. Sitting next to an emergency exit did not promise anything, as shown by this tragedy. Only a bare few escaped and only as fate had it. These were the musings of many when dead bodies were brought down by helicopters from Mount Osutaka in bright blankets (Magnuson, Aviation Safety Network, AAIC, BBC, BBC (. This disaster and others before and subsequent call for more responsive prevention measures to save lives in this era of massive global air travel.

VII. Recommendations

The Safety Promotion Center was opened in 2006 to train employees and alert them to the importance of airline safety and personal responsibility for safety. The ultimate responsibility falls squarely on the shoulders of Japan Airlines and the Japanese government. Japan's reported refusal to allow U.S. military forces to immediately provide rescue at the crash site is well documented. But this and other documented air disasters show the two countries' significant differences in caring for lives. The protection of individual privacy points to the strong individualism in the United States. In contrast, Japan relishes more deeply entrenched cultural expectations than the United States' (Haruta & Hallahan, 2000). Culture surfaces as the central basis for the difference in managing communication and taking action in emergencies. As the world continues to become more and more independent, culture should be the key consideration in handling and undertaking difficult situations like this.

The foregoing data should draw attention to the role of human error in disasters and proposed models of safety. The Human Factors Analysis and Classification System framework connects theory and practice. Thus, it arms investigators of air disasters with a comprehensive, practicable tool in identifying and classifying the human causes to an air accident. The HFAC covers the entire gamut of human error, including the conditions of craft operators and organizational failure. It and other similar methods are helpful tools in discovering and measuring human error and remedying it. In the hands of safety professionals who investigate human error right in the disaster field, it can help them trace or detect disaster loopholes. More importantly, HFAC can evaluate the success or failure of existing intervention programs by tracking down the specific type of human error in a specific air accident. That way, research investments and safety programs can be re-adjusted or reinforced to respond to safety and prevention requirements. #

BIBLIOGRAPHY

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Investigation Commission. Retrieved on January 30,

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Aviation Safety Network (2009). Japan Airlines Flight 123. Flight Safety Foundation.

Retrieved on January 30, 2012 from http://www.aviation-safety.net/database/record.php?id=19850812-1

Article Trend (2010). This day in history -- JAL Flight 123 crashes. Word Press.

Retrieved on January 30, 2012 from http://www.article-trend.com/2010/08/this-day-in-history-flight-123-crashes

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Human Factors. Retrieved on January 30, 2012 from http://www.system-sfety.com/AviationHFNews/2010/Volume6,Issue37.pdf

BBC (2008). Hundreds dead in Boeing crash. BBC News: British Broadcasting

Company. Retrieved on January 30, 2012 from http://www.news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/august/12/newsid_2529000

- (2005). Japan marks air crash anniversary. http://www.news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/4144688.stm

Haruta, a. And Hallahan K. (2000). Cultural issues in airline crisis communication: a U.S.-Japan comparative study. Colorado State University. Retrieved on January 30,

2012 from http://www.lamar.colostate.edu/~pr/airline.pdf

JAL (1985). Safety promotion center. Japan Airlines. Retrieved on January 30, 2012 from http://www.jal.com/en/safety/center1985

Kilroy C. (2008). Special report flight 123. Air Disaster.com. Retrieved on January 30,

2012 from http://www.airdisaster.com/special/special-jal123.shtml

Magnuson, E. (2005). Disasters: last minutes of JAL 123. Time Magazine: Time, Inc.

Retrieved on January 30, 2012 from http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1074738-5,00.html

NTSB (2012). Accident reports. National Transportation Safety Board. Retrieved on January 30, 2012 from http://www.ntsb.gov/investigations/process.html

Rebok, G.W. et al. (2009). Pilot age and error in air-taxi crashes. 80 (7) Journal of Aviation Space Environmental Medicine. Retrieved on January 30, 2012 from http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2810200

Seeman, R. (1985). World's worst air crash. The Japan Law Letter. Retrieved on January 30, 2012 from http://www.japanlaw.info/lawletter/nov85/faa.htm

Shappell, S.A. And Wiegmann D.A. (2000). The human factors…

Sources Used in Document:

BIBLIOGRAPHY

AAIC (2002). JA8254. Aircraft Accident Investigation Report. Aircraft Accident

Investigation Commission. Retrieved on January 30,

2012 from http://www.mlit.go.jp/jtsb/eng-air_report/JA8254.pdf

- (1985). http://www.mlit.go.jp/jtsb/eng-air_report/JA8119.pdf

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