Bathsheba There Are Many Biblical Thesis

  • Length: 6 pages
  • Sources: 3
  • Subject: Mythology - Religion
  • Type: Thesis
  • Paper: #62971689

Excerpt from Thesis :

She reminds David about his promise of the throne to her son, and with the demise of David there is a chance of herself and her children being treated as outcastes with danger to their persons. And the forceful prevailing upon the aging Davis seems to have had the desired effect with the Solomon's kingship occurring outside the prophetic Yahwism.

Thus did Bathsheba change the course of history? She also was a part of it having much influence in the court of Solomon as the queen mother.

(5) Assessment/Analysis/Criticism

Over the course of time many writers have discussed the character of Bathsheba and we find her nature discussed, as a post mortem analysis and much conjecture. There is no direct writing on her. Firstly the Old Testament was centered on the King and generals with a bias to males and the females having been given no importance. In fact the King could command the woman of his general to cohabit with him, and without compunction first try to impale the resulting pregnancy on the general and then kill him to hide it was all centered on the events that the male interactions caused, with the woman being given no emotional attributes. We find the sadness of the death of his sons depicted for David, but find no mention of Bathsheba's agony over first the murder of her husband and then the death of her child. It is only where she seems to have interfered on behalf of her son and later had a hand in exterminating his enemies that we find Bathsheba mentioned, and all other statements are conjectures of various writers.

On the whole the original literature is scant in this respect. Bathsheba no doubt was a powerful personality who seems to have made capital use of situations that came her way, but anything we further seek to describe can only be subjective, and therefore can be anything. Bathsheba seems to have been loyal to David, and while she seems to have her loyalty fixed on the King, she also listens to the prophet and finds his guidance valuable. This shows that she was practical and open to good counsel. She also seems to have been a good mother with far sight. All these can be interpretations from what we could infer from the original material that is scanty about describing women in the biblical times.

What if we could talk to Bathsheba now?

If Bathsheba was around now, I would be interested in what were her emotions regarding Uriah's death. The thesis is that what happened to her at the bath and thereafter was a force of circumstance. The death of Uriah was premeditated. And like Hamlets mother she was forced to live with the murderer of her husband. Having not played any part in tempting David and having been faithful to Uriah till then, and seeing the noble nature of Uriah, we have this to ask her: Was her relationship with David a position as in the harem of Mugal Shieks, or could she transfer her love from her husband to the man who took her away from him and did him in? Did she love David? May be even Bathsheba can only answer "God Knows!"

References

Cixous, Helene. Stigmata: escaping texts.

Routledge. 2007

Hagensick, Carl. Nine Men in the Life of Bathsheba. Herald Magazine. Available from http://www.heraldmag.org/literature/bio_1.htm accessed 28 January 2010.

Jacobson, David C. Modern Midrash: The Retelling of Traditional Jewish Narratives by Twentieth-Century Hebrew Writers. State University of New York Press: Albany, NY, 1987.

N.A. "Bathsheba: Wife of King David and mother of King Solomon Bible Study Resource:

Women of the Old Testament." Available from http://www.womeninthebible.net/1.11.Bathsheba.htm accessed 28 January 2010.

Van Der Bergh, Ronald H. Deadly Traits: A Narratological Analysis of Character in Samuel 11.

Old Testament Essays 21, no. 1 (2008): 180-192.

Wozniuk, Vladimir. The Wisdom of Solomon as Political Theology. Journal of Church and State 39, no. 4 (1997): 657.

Vladimir Wozniuk. The Wisdom of Solomon as Political Theology. Journal of Church and State 39, no. 4 (1997): 657.

Vladimir Wozniuk. The Wisdom of Solomon as Political Theology. Journal of Church and State 39, no. 4 (1997): 658.

Ronald H. Van Der Bergh. Deadly Traits: A Narratological Analysis of Character in Samuel 11. Old Testament Essays 21, no. 1 (2008): 183.

Ronald H. Van Der Bergh. (2008): 183.

Ronald H. Van Der Bergh. Deadly Traits: A Narratological Analysis of Character in Samuel 11. Old Testament Essays 21, no. 1 (2008): 184.

Ronald H. Van Der Bergh. Deadly Traits: A Narratological Analysis of Character in Samuel 11. Old Testament Essays 21, no. 1 (2008): 184.

N.A. "Bathsheba: Wife of King David and mother of King Solomon Bible Study Resource: Women of the Old Testament." Available from http://www.womeninthebible.net/1.11.Bathsheba.htm accessed 28 January 2010.

N.A. "Bathsheba: Wife of King David and mother of King Solomon Bible Study Resource: Women of the Old Testament."

N.A. "Bathsheba: Wife of King David and mother of King Solomon Bible Study Resource: Women of the Old Testament."

Carl Hagensick. Nine Men in the Life of Bathsheba. Herald Magazine. Available fromhttp://www.heraldmag.org/literature/bio_1.htm accessed 28 January 2010.

Carl Hagensick. Nine Men in the Life of Bathsheba. Herald Magazine. Available fromhttp://www.heraldmag.org/literature/bio_1.htm accessed 28 January 2010.

David C. Jacobson. Modern Midrash: The Retelling of Traditional Jewish Narratives by Twentieth-Century Hebrew Writers. State University of New…

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