Gray Wolf, Giving Some Natural Term Paper

Excerpt from Term Paper :

Because ranchers have long distrusted wolves, most ranchers in the surrounding area saw the wolves as a threat to their livestock and their very way of life. They also cite history that shows wolves are quite difficult to dissuade from attacking vulnerable livestock, and that many ranchers and farmers saw eliminating the wolf as the only real way to protect their stock and their families. Writers Smith and Phillips continue,

Although several methods have been developed to minimize or prevent depredations, few have proven successful. Guard dogs have been used widely, but with marginal results. Generally one guard dog is not sufficient, as several dogs seem necessary to deter a wolf attack. Another approach requires farmers and ranchers to intensify husbandry of livestock (e.g., confine sheep to structures overnight, develop calving areas near ranch headquarters, or monitor open range stock daily). Ultimately, killing the wolf or wolves responsible for the depredation is often the only long-term solution (Smith & Phillips, 2000, p. 221).

Before the wolves came back to Yellowstone, many area ranchers protested. Another writer says, "Local ranchers portrayed themselves as cowboy defenders of their own 'Wild West', and regarded the wolf in Yellowstone as an affront to their distinguished pioneer history. Westerners cast themselves as the endangered species threatened by what one rancher called a 'hazardous waste' of wolves" (Jones, 2002). In fact, some wolves have strayed outside the park and killed some wildlife, but for the most part, the wolves remain within the boundaries of the park, and as they quickly acclimated to their new homes, they "resumed customary canine activities, establishing territories and hunting trails throughout the park" (Jones, 2002). The wolves have become one of the most popular symbols of Yellowstone, and today, thousands of
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tourists make the trip to the park just to view the wolves in the wild.

Conclusion

In conclusion, the gray wolf and its subspecies are once again making a comeback in many areas of America. In fact, in 2003, the government reclassified the gray wolf as "threatened" from endangered in some parts of the American West. While the wolf still causes controversy and discord, many more environmentalists, scientist, and citizens recognize the importance of the wolf in the ecological balance of the American environment. In fact, many communities welcome back the wolf with open arms. Wolves are complicated and interesting animals that have many things in common with humankind. They are social animals, and their relatives are some of man's true best friends. Domesticated dogs bring the best of wolf and man together, and are an indication of how canines can interact with humans successfully. As the wolf population in America continues to increase, there will certainly be continued problems with those who oppose and even hate the wolves, but in the end, it seems the wolf will survive, as it had for thousands of years.

References

Donnelly, K.J. (1999, January). Canine in the wild. World and I, 14, 180.

Editors. (2005). Gray wolf. Retrieved from the National Wildlife Federation Web site: http://www.nwf.org/wildlife/graywolf / 26 Aug. 2005.

Jones, K. (2002, March). Fighting outlaws, returning wolves: Karen Jones examines the significance of the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park. History Today, 52, 38+.

Li, J. (2000). The wolves may have won the battle, but not the war: How the west was won under the Northern Rocky Mountain wolf recovery plan. Environmental Law, 30(3), 677.

Reading, R.P. & Miller, B. (Eds.). (2000). Endangered animals: A…

Sources Used in Documents:

References

Donnelly, K.J. (1999, January). Canine in the wild. World and I, 14, 180.

Editors. (2005). Gray wolf. Retrieved from the National Wildlife Federation Web site: http://www.nwf.org/wildlife/graywolf / 26 Aug. 2005.

Jones, K. (2002, March). Fighting outlaws, returning wolves: Karen Jones examines the significance of the reintroduction of wolves into Yellowstone National Park. History Today, 52, 38+.

Li, J. (2000). The wolves may have won the battle, but not the war: How the west was won under the Northern Rocky Mountain wolf recovery plan. Environmental Law, 30(3), 677.

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