Character From a Movie, Gordon Term Paper

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Robert Romano on the TV show "ER (Robbins, 2005).

The metaphorical significance of greed in combination with selfishness, as currently mistaken for these two disorders combined, and its identification with social, economic, cultural, along with even religious status mistakes CEOs, media giants, and fortunate investors for people with this psychological disorder. In some cases, symbolic of praise; in others, disdain. The psychoanalytic explanation of greedy behavior further misleads people, who misunderstand greedy diplomatic, corporate, and political leaders, with those symptomatic of a disorder in need of treatment. At times the study of its insidious consequences on the self and on society drives a standard of hatred applicable to both.

Conclusion

Applicable Approach: Psychoanalytic Therapy

Clients interested in psychoanalysis must be willing to commit to an intensive and long-term therapy process. The intent of psychoanalytic therapy is to allow access to the unconscious as a source of conflicts and motivations. The therapist uses techniques such as free association (the client reports anything that comes to mind) and dream analysis (the interpretation of the client's dreams) to find commonalities in the client's thoughts and behaviors and to then interpret them in terms of the client's problems.

The treatment process can, at times, become blocked by the client's resistance (their unwillingness to provide information). Transference is a condition in which the client begins to consider their therapist in the same emotional way they would consider a person in their lives, such as a parent or sibling. Working with interpretation, resistance, and transference is sometimes called "working through," a therapeutic technique in which the therapist helps the client better understand their conflicts and how to resolve them (Psychologist 4therapy.com)

Esteemed Quotes to Enhance Identification

Greed is an impetuous and insatiable craving, exceeding what the subject needs and what the object is able and willing to give. Greed aims at possession of all of the goodness that can be extracted from the object, regardless of consequences, perhaps leading to destruction or spoiling of the goodness - but this is incidental, or innocent. Greed is mainly bound up with introjection, while envy is bound up with projection. Indiscriminate idealization can be fueled by greed, since the need to get the best from everywhere interferes with the capacity for selection and discrimination.

It is my view that greediness is a primary state, a basic expression of Self and of desire. But, an intensity of greed can lead to envy. Greediness can exhaust the good object, such that it seems to be withholding, setting up precisely the conditions for envy. The infant has no inkling of the limits of the world, limits of the mother, or the breast. It has no idea that the demands it will make cannot always be met instantly, and in full. A primary task in human development is to temper such demands, through a capacity for concern (Winnicott, 1963).

For the mature ego, greediness and neediness will be a continuing theme. Although, in my experience with clients who are not seriously disturbed, a more common complication is a denial of greediness, sometimes experienced as emptiness. This stems from a conflict with the super-ego. It is not unusual in such cases to uncover damage or vulnerability in some early good object (n.b. Winnicott calls this the locus of concern). This may then be sufficient to result in the client's greediness being denied for fear of exhausting or completely destroying the good object. (Hiles, 2009)

References

Hiles, D.R. (2009) http://www.psy.dmu.ac.uk/drhiles/pdf's/Hiles%20(2009)%20Envy%20Paper%20(CCPE%20-%2009).pdf" Envy, Jealousy, Greed: A Kleinian approach. Paper presented to CCPE, London.

Winnicott, D.W. (1963) The Development of the matter of concern. In: The Maturational

Process and the Facilitating Environment: Studies in the theory of emotional development. Hogarth Press.

Robbins, MD Lawrence. Personality Disorders. November 2005.

Psychoanalysis. (2008, November 15). New World Encyclopedia. Retrieved 08:16, April 18, 2010 fromhttp://www.newworldencyclopedia.org/entry/Psychoanalysis?oldid=854004.

Moore BE, Fine BD (1968), A Glossary of Psychoanalytic Terms and Concepts, Amer Psychoanalytic Assn, p. 78,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/International_Standard_Book_Number

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Sources Used in Document:

References

Hiles, D.R. (2009) http://www.psy.dmu.ac.uk/drhiles/pdf's/Hiles%20(2009)%20Envy%20Paper%20(CCPE%20-%2009).pdf" Envy, Jealousy, Greed: A Kleinian approach. Paper presented to CCPE, London.

Winnicott, D.W. (1963) The Development of the matter of concern. In: The Maturational

Process and the Facilitating Environment: Studies in the theory of emotional development. Hogarth Press.

Robbins, MD Lawrence. Personality Disorders. November 2005.

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