Codes of Ethics Comparison Both Research Paper

Excerpt from Research Paper :



Discrimination

On the topic of discrimination, both the ACA and AACC codes of ethics go into considerable length and detail. However, their respective focus is substantially different, reflecting their underlying philosophical perspectives. For example, the basis of the AACC commitment to nondiscrimination is the equality of all persons in the eyes of God. In that respect, the AACC refers to the God-given dignity of every human person as a creation of God and therefore fully entitled to all of the same rights and respect as all other human persons.

The ACA Code of Ethics also expressly details its commitment to nondiscrimination but articulates an entirely different philosophical approach and underlying basis. Specifically, the ACA rationale reflects contemporary secular ethical concepts that are consistent with concepts of nondiscrimination that are incorporated into the social, legal, and governmental fabric of American society much more generally. For example, the ACA specifically refers to the inappropriateness of discrimination based on the following factors: age, culture, disability, ethnicity, race, religion/spirituality, gender, gender identity, sexual orientation, marital status/partnership, language preference, socioeconomic status, or any basis proscribed by law.

Client Records

The respective ethical codes of the ACA and the AACC are much closer to one another in their content and effect than the other two reviewed aspects of the codes. Whereas other aspects of the AACC Code are derived from theological perspectives (such as in the case of discrimination issues), the sections addressing the handling and ownership of client records seems to defer to secular law and to professional standards of definitions of counseling ethics and confidentiality issues.

The main area of difference between the respective codes of ethics is that the AACC Code of Ethics focuses on the handling, ownership, and disclosure of records. By contrast, the ACA Code of Ethics also covers the proper documentation of client records. More particularly, the ACA standards pertain to the sufficiency of the records in their function as efficiently documenting the progress of clients during their treatment. This difference would appear to be a function of the more standardized and empirical, evidence-based practice of professional counseling in one case, and of the less formal processes and procedures of counseling services delivered in the context of religious worship.

References

Code of Ethics of the American Counseling. (2005). Association Accessed 8 Nov, 2010,

http://www.counseling.org/Resources/CodeOfEthics/TP/Home/CT2.aspx

Code of Ethics of the American Association of Christian Counselors. (2004). Accessed 8

Nov, 2010, from: http://www.aacc.net/about-us/code-of-ethics/

Sources Used in Document:

References

Code of Ethics of the American Counseling. (2005). Association Accessed 8 Nov, 2010,

http://www.counseling.org/Resources/CodeOfEthics/TP/Home/CT2.aspx

Code of Ethics of the American Association of Christian Counselors. (2004). Accessed 8

Nov, 2010, from: http://www.aacc.net/about-us/code-of-ethics/

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