Pavilion Narration and Setting in essay

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He describes in clear and unequivocal terms the nature of his friends and the other characters that he encounters. He also tends to discuss both the bad and the good points of the other characters. This can seen in the way that he does not fail to describe Northmour as bad tempered and violent but also shows his more noble qualities as well.

However, it must be remembered that the narrator's point-of-view is subjective. He can be a little one-sided in his view -- especially when it comes to Clara and her father who are, to a certain degree, are judged by their outward appearance. Clara is described in glowing terms as being beautiful, good and wholesome. However, the father is described as cowardly and insincere, as well as being sickly. The underlying bias and the way that appearance affects the narrator's point-of-view are clear for the following quotation.

I gave him my hand, of course, because I could not help it; but the sympathy I had been prepared to feel for Clara's father was immediately soured by his appearance, and the wheedling, unreal tones in which he spoke.

2.4. Do we know what he is thinking about ?

The narrator is very clear about his views and ideas about the others and the events that occur. His narrative is straightforward and there is no doubt how he feels about things -- as can be seen in his view of Clara's father discussed above.

3. Narration

3.1. Are events presented in chronological order or not, how many things is narrated, told, in detail or not the events in the story are generally told in a logical narrative sequence. The narrator tells a story that occurred in the past but he presents the tale in a chronological sequence of events that follow from his first meeting with Northmour to his reported death.

Many of the events are described in great detail but usually the most detailed events are the most important in terms of the central drama, themes and actions in the story. For example, the meeting with Cara and the attack on the house are described in depth.

However, a technique used that adds to the central theme of mystery in the story is sometimes to provide only the most essential and barest details about a character or an event. This increases the suspense and mystery, which is central to the story, and also motivates the reader to use his or her imagination, which adds to the depth of the story. A good example of the use and effectiveness of minimal description to provoke interest is when the first Italian in the quicksand is described. Another good example is when he narrator describes the first serious fight that he had with Northmour, which prompted him to leave the company of his friend. The description is sparse and not very detailed.

Northmour spoke hotly, I remember, and I suppose I must have made some tart rejoinder. He leaped from his chair and grappled me; I had to fight, without exaggeration, for my life; and it was only with a great effort that I mastered him, for he was near as strong in body as myself, and seemed filled with the devil. The next morning, we met on our usual terms; but I judged it more delicate to withdraw; nor did he attempt to dissuade me.

3.2. Mood in the stories

The mood in this story is described as gothic in many studies. Gothic refers to as certain mood and tone that is often characterized by danger, violence, madness and the supernatural. It is an atmosphere that is "… conducive to anxieties in the protagonist and, depending on the situation in the story, among other characters in general."

It should also be noted that he gothic in art and literature is defined and described in numerous ways and with a great degree of controversy and disagreement. However, a central component of the Gothic that is found in this short story is the mixture of suspense, dark motives and actions and romance.

It is the romantic relationship between Clara and the narrator that acts[continue]

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