Romantic Era the Romantic Period Research Paper

  • Length: 4 pages
  • Sources: 6
  • Subject: Literature
  • Type: Research Paper
  • Paper: #6115824

Excerpt from Research Paper :

They brought a new sense of "free experimentation" to composition, while advancing realistic techniques that emphasized the use of "local color" in literature.

This style in the literary world helps to define the Romantic Era and has shaped writing to this day.

Science:

Of equal importance to literary pursuits during the Romantic era were achievements in science. By the 1830's, activity in science and technology was rapidly increasing and becoming a source of pride for nations.

The term "scientist" was coined during this time, and there was a movement away from spiritual and theological studies. The advancement of the discipline into more systemized categories led "men of science from all over Europe into developing new ways of conceptualizing the world."

Many scientific accomplishments occurred during this time period, including vaccinations, economic botany, and magnetism. At the same time, science was being brought out of the laboratory and into the home. As a result, "science fuelled a global circulation of wealth and power."

Literary artists spread the scientific manipulations of nature adopted by the Romantic era, as seen is Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, helping to bring an appreciation for science to the public.

Imperialism:

Science was in part propelled by the imperialistic nature nations like Great Britain adopted at this time. Toward the later half of the 1790's, exploration to once foreign lands began to be common practice. The British began to take over parts of Southern Africa and they took control of the Cape Colony.

Britain quickly became the largest empire in world history at that time and colonialism became a defining factor of the era.

Even the church felt the effects of colonialism during this time due to the rise of many missionary societies.

Both for capitalistic gains as well as cultural and ideological extension, imperialism globalized English literature while it aided in controlling the natives of conquered lands.

Imperialism helped spread a liberal education around the world, further highlighting scientific findings in places like England, America, and Germany. It did so by using a newly composed form of literature that drew on imagination to create perspectives for a greater worldview made possible through exploration and expansion.

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Cambridge University Press. (Accessed February 28, 2011) Available from http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/samples/cam031/97044330.pdf.

Fulford, T., Lee, D., & Kitson, P.J. Literature, Science, and Exploration in the Romantic Era:

Bodies of Knowledge. New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2004.

Kreis, S. The Romantic Era: Lessons on Modern European Intellectual History. (Accessed

March 1, 2011) Available from http://www.historyguide.org/intellect/lecture16a.html.

Ladd, a., Meyers, K., & Phillips, J. Romanticism and Transcendentalism: 1800-1860. New

York, NY: Chelsea House, 2010.

Murray, C.J. Encyclopedia of the Romantic Era: 1760-1850. New York, NY: Fitzroy Dearborn,

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Nichols, a.A Romantic Natural History Timeline 1750-1859. Dickinson College. (Accessed

February 28, 2011) Available from http://users.dickinson.edu/~nicholsa/Romnat/timeline.htm.

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A. Ladd, et al., Romanticism and Transcendentalism: 1800-1860 (New York, NY: Chelsea House) 107.

Ladd, 107.

T. Fulford, et al., Literature, Science, and Expoloration in the Romantic Era (New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2004) 18.

Ladd, 107.

S. Kreis, the Romantic Era: Lectures on Modern European Intellectual History, March 1, 2011, Available from http://www.historyguide.org/intellect/lecture16a.html

A. Nichols, a Romantic Natural History Timeline: 1750-1859, Dickinson College, February 28, 2011, http://users.dickinson.edu/~nicholsa/Romnat/index.html

Ladd, 108.

http://users.dickinson.edu/~nicholsa/Romnat/index.html

C.J. Murray, Encyclopedia of the Romantic Era: 1760-1850 (New York, NY: Fitzroy Dearborn, 2004), 789.

Ladd, 109.

C.J. Murray, Encyclopedia of the Romantic Era: 1760-1850 (New York, NY: Fitzroy Dearborn, 2004), 789.

Murray, 789.

Murray, 789.

Murray, 789.

Murray, 789.

Murray, 789.

T. Fulford, et al., Literature, Science, and Expoloration in the Romantic Era (New York, NY: Cambridge University Press, 2004) 18.

Fulford, 18.

Romanticism, a Guide to the Study of Literature, March 2, 2011, http://academic.brooklyn.cuny.edu/english/melani/cs6/rom.html

Fulford, 12.

Fulford, 5.

Fulford, 65.

T. Fulford, & P. Kitson, Romanticism and Colonialism: Writing and Empire, 1780-1830 (New York, NY: Cambridge University Press) February 28, 2011, http://catdir.loc.gov/catdir/samples/cam031/97044330.pdf.

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