Andrew Jackson Has the Dubious Term Paper

  • Length: 7 pages
  • Sources: 15
  • Subject: Native Americans
  • Type: Term Paper
  • Paper: #31282165

Excerpt from Term Paper :

.. The philanthropist will rejoice that the remnant of that ill-fated race has at length been placed beyond the reach of injury or oppression.

Jackson was also moved by his early years as a frontier layer, traveling from court to court as an attorney or anything really was fraught with danger and many sleepless nights holding a vigil for one's safety from Indians.

What he specifically did with this information and this dogmatic belief system was legislate and arm himself for the sole purpose of removing the Indians from land the white man wanted.

According to several experts on Jackson's life the whole of his life was spent dealing with the Indian question. He sought through actions and legislation to free the land from Indian rights to it. So that the white man could progress according to the long held plan of civilization. He came to terms with any desire to educate and protect the Indian, in the same manner he came to terms with his personal empathy for the militiamen, it was a matter of duty for the Indians to relinquish the land and if they did not he would remove them from it. He sought not to do so without force, force was allowed when it was needed. It is also crucial to understand that Jackson directly effected later standards that would build a case for Indian removal and many would say coercion and even obliteration of Indian populations, wherever the white people held a desire to settle. The expansion west, over the very land that was supposed to be set aside by the government for the Natives to live out their lives under their own jurisdiction was later emptied of natives as well, or at the very least diminished considerably by white advantage. One can see from the eulogy quoted below that the Indians really did not fit into the idea of westward expansion, no matter how "legitimate" and well intentioned Jackson had been in his removal policy.

When Jackson died, a eulogist, having described his Indian removal policy as 'most humane,' said: "His constant aim was to enlarge the area of Christianity and civilization, to diffuse the blessings of our liberties and laws throughout the western wilderness. During his time, much was accomplished nor shall we stop here.

Westward we have pressed westward still is our destiny."

Jackson's actions and words convinced millions of people to challenge the allowance of natives on any piece of land that might hold value to them or their children in the future.

Jackson himself waged a constant battle, both real and political in favor of white progress and settlement and by default helped create a pervasive Indian removal policy that outlived him and fed a continued separation and fear. Jackson, a self-made man used his military might to create a forced stalemate between individual Indian groups and the white government and then when this was fully established sought t continue to fight for such progress, as a politician. Through the political debates that he started and participated in and through the many pieces of legislation he supported and signed into law, the most universal of which being the Indian Removal Act of 1830, Jackson furthered a national dogma of expansion and progress that left very little if any room for the "red man." Jackson created, with bold action and clever utilization of public sentiment and historical sentiment a standard by which expansion was made possible and ownership of the nation became almost the sole opportunity of the white settlers under the protection of the federal, state and local government.

Works Cited

Andrew Jackson Biography" www.whitehouse.govnd.

Buchanan, John. Jackson's Way: Andrew Jackson and the People of the Western Waters. New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2001.

Dusenbery B. M, http://www.amazon.com/Monument-memory-General-Andrew-Jackson/dp/B0008CT4TI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1207696220&sr=8-1" Monument to the memory of General Andrew Jackson: Containing twenty-five eulogies and sermons delivered on occasion of his death: to which is added an... whole preceded by a short sketch of his life (New York: James a. Bill, 1846)

Indian Wars Timetable" www.u-s-history.comnd.

Harris, J. G. 'Eulogy Delivered at Charlotte, Tenn., July 17, 1845,' in Dusenbery B. M, http://www.amazon.com/Monument-memory-General-Andrew-Jackson/dp/B0008CT4TI/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1207696220&sr=8-1" Monument to the memory of General Andrew Jackson: Containing twenty-five eulogies and sermons delivered on occasion of his death: to which is added an... whole preceded by a short sketch of his life (New York: James a. Bill, 1846), pp. 326-7.

Jackson, Andrew, Farewell Address in John William Ward, Andrew Jackson, Symbol for an Age (London: Oxford University Press, 1962), 41.

Jackson, Andrew Letter: Andrew Jackson to Samuel Swartout, December 14, 1824, in John William Ward, Andrew Jackson, Symbol for an Age (London: Oxford University Press, 1962), 43.

Jackson, Andrew Letter: Andrew Jackson to Aaron V. Brown, February 12, 1843, in Parton, James the Life of Andrew Jackson Volume 3, (New York: Kessinger, 2007), 658.

Jaroff, Rebecca. "Opposing Forces: (Re)playing Pocahontas and the Politics of Indian Removal on the Antebellum Stage." Comparative Drama 40.4 (2006): 483.

Meyers, Jason. "No Idle Past: Uses of History in the 1830 Indian Removal Debates." The Historian 63.1 (2000): 53.

Ogg, Frederic Austin. The Reign of Andrew Jackson: A Chronicle of the Frontier in Politics. New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1919.

Ratner, Lorman a. Andrew Jackson and His Tennessee Lieutenants: A Study in Political Culture. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1997.

Skeen, C. Edward. "In Bitterness and in Tears: Andrew Jackson's Destruction of the Creeks and Seminoles." The Historian 67.1 (2005): 128.

Ward, John William. Andrew Jackson, Symbol for an Age. London: Oxford University Press, 1962.

The War of 1812: Battle of Horseshoe Bend" http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1128.html

Letter - Andrew

Jackson to Aaron V. Brown, February 12, 1843, in James Parton (2007) the Life of Andrew Jackson Vol.3, p. 658.

2. "Andrew Jackson Biography" www.whitehouse.govND

3. "The War of 1812: Battle of Horseshoe Bend" http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1128.html

4. "The War of 1812: Battle of Horseshoe Bend" http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h1128.html

http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=28026069

Lorman a. Ratner, Andrew Jackson and His Tennessee Lieutenants: A Study in Political Culture (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1997), 23, http://www.questia.com/PM.qst?a=o&d=28026069.

6. "Indian Wars Timetable" www.u-s-history.comnd

7. "Indian Wars Timetable" http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h336.html. nd

Rebecca Jaroff, "Opposing Forces: (Re)playing Pocahontas and the Politics of Indian Removal on the Antebellum Stage," Comparative Drama 40, no. 4 (2006)

Jason Meyers, "No Idle Past: Uses of History in the 1830 Indian Removal Debates," the Historian 63, no. 1 (2000): 53.

Sean Michael O'Brian in Bitterness and in Tears: Andrew Jackson's Destruction of the Creeks and Seminoles," (Westport, CN: Preager, 2003), 224.

Frederic Austin Ogg, the Reign of Andrew Jackson: A Chronicle of the Frontier in Politics (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1919), 207.

Jason Meyers, "No Idle Past: Uses of History in the 1830 Indian Removal Debates," the Historian 63, no. 1 (2000): 53.

Frederic Austin Ogg, the Reign of Andrew Jackson: A Chronicle of the Frontier in Politics (New Haven, CT: Yale University Press, 1919), 209.

15. Andrew Jackson to Samuel Swartout, December 14, 1824, in John William Ward, Andrew Jackson, Symbol for an Age (London: Oxford University Press, 1962), 43.

Andrew Jackson's Farewell address in John William Ward, Andrew Jackson, Symbol for an Age (London: Oxford University Press, 1962), 41.

John Buchanan, Jackson's Way: Andrew Jackson and the People of the Western Waters (New York: John Wiley & Sons, 2001), 113-4.

John William Ward, Andrew Jackson, Symbol for an Age (London: Oxford University Press, 1962), 146.

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