Drinking While Pregnant on Unborn Research Proposal

Excerpt from Research Proposal :



In the article "Pregnancy & Treatment," Linda L.M. Worley, past medical director of UAMS Arkansas CARES: Center for Addiction, Research, Education and Services, and Curtis Lowery (2005), maternal fetal medicine expert, report that a number of medical and child welfare groups, including the American Medical Association, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, the American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Nurses Association, and the March of Dimes, conclude that threatening to arrest pregnant women who drink alcohol beverages will not help them quit drinking. "Rather, it will frighten them away from prenatal care and discourage them from speaking honestly to health care providers who may be able to help" (Worley & Lowery, 2005, ¶ 2). Worley and Lowery (2005) recommend that instead of imprisoning pregnant mothers, drug treatment "works and is much less expensive than imprisoning" them. When pregnant mothers are imprisoned, the state may not only incur delivery charges and charge to care for the newborn, it may also have to pay expenses of foster care. For every $1 spent on the state instead invests to treat the pregnant mother, society will receive a return of $7.

Conclusion

In response to the first question considered during this thesis, the researcher finds that effects from drinking alcohol when pregnant may range from and/or include, but not be limited to physical abnormalities; growth retardation; brain damage; death of the fetus. Warnings, the literature finds, do not typically work as noted by the continuation of pregnant women drinking despite warnings on every bottle of alcoholic beverages. What may work with women who drink while pregnant, the literature reviewed for this thesis suggests, is treatment.

To help ensure those who need help to discontinue drinking while pregnant, however, perhaps, the practice should, in a sense, be considered a "crime." The researcher perceives that the currently legal, preventable, hazardous activity of drinking while pregnant may, in fact, constitute a crime as it routinely harms the unborn baby. This "crime," the researcher asserts should not be one that mandates incarceration in a prison or jail; however, but instead one that supports the practice of ordering pregnant women who drink to receive treatment and monitoring during their pregnancy. As the alcohol from the mother's system, when consumed during pregnancy, does not only affect the mother, but also filters through her blood and adversely affects the unborn baby, continuing to drink while pregnant constitutes not only an appalling, but, in a sense, an illegal practice.

REFERENCES

Cave, E. (2004). The mother of all crimes: Human rights, criminalization, and the child born alive. Hants, England: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

Chudler, E.H. (2008). Alcohol and the brain. Neuroscience for Kids. Retrieved October 27,

2009 from http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/alco.html

Denny, C.H., Tsai, J., Floyd, R.L. & Green, P.P. (2009). Alcohol use among pregnant and nonpregnant women of childbearing age - United States, 1991-2005. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. U.S. Center for Disease Control. Retrieved October 27, 2009

from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1738209271.html

Eric, M., Vuckovic, N., Marcel, L., Culig, J. & Krivokuca, D. (2008). Alcohol abuse during pregnancy. Alcoholism. Centre for Study and Control of Alcoholism and Addictions,

Zagreb. Retrieved October 27, 2009 from HighBeam Research:

http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1653190091.html

Female lawmakers and laws criminalizing pregnant women who drink. (2007). National Center

on Addiction and Substance Abuse. Columbia University. Retrieved October 30,

2009

from http://www.jointogether.org/news/headlines/inthenews/2007/female lawmakers-and-laws-on.html

Krulewitch, C.J. (2005). Chapter 4: Alcohol consumption during pregnancy. Annual Review of Nursing Research. Springer Publishing Company. Retrieved October 27, 2009 from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-924276861.html

Rollin, C. (2006). Ancient Carthage . World History Project, USA. Retrieved October 29, 2009

from http://history-world.org/

St. John, B. (2008). Social drinking among pregnant women. International Journal of Childbirth

Education. International Childbirth Education Association. Retrieved October 27, 2009

from HighBeam Research: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1502758721.html Worley, L.L.M. & Lowery.…

Sources Used in Document:

REFERENCES

Cave, E. (2004). The mother of all crimes: Human rights, criminalization, and the child born alive. Hants, England: Ashgate Publishing, Ltd.

Chudler, E.H. (2008). Alcohol and the brain. Neuroscience for Kids. Retrieved October 27,

2009 from http://faculty.washington.edu/chudler/alco.html

Denny, C.H., Tsai, J., Floyd, R.L. & Green, P.P. (2009). Alcohol use among pregnant and nonpregnant women of childbearing age - United States, 1991-2005. Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. U.S. Center for Disease Control. Retrieved October 27, 2009

Cite This Research Proposal:

"Drinking While Pregnant On Unborn" (2009, October 30) Retrieved July 21, 2019, from
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/drinking-while-pregnant-on-unborn-18077

"Drinking While Pregnant On Unborn" 30 October 2009. Web.21 July. 2019. <
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/drinking-while-pregnant-on-unborn-18077>

"Drinking While Pregnant On Unborn", 30 October 2009, Accessed.21 July. 2019,
https://www.paperdue.com/essay/drinking-while-pregnant-on-unborn-18077