U.S. Television Sitcoms on Emotional Essay

Excerpt from Essay :

One study revealed Berry (2003) found that young children's retention of emotional information was greater in children viewing family sitcom than those who just watch an animated films or moppet program. This result justifies the fact that children are more likely to learn more due to the presence of human characters in family sitcoms as they find these characters more close to the reality than either cartoon or Muppet characters.

On investigating the type of family interaction shown in family sitcoms it was revealed that majority of family interactions were constructive or supportive in nature. Nonetheless, just about one fourth of these interactions were found to involve argument or negativity. Research shows that even though large amount of verbal and nonverbal interactions between siblings in family sitcoms were positive, nearly 40% of the examined behaviors were found to be negative (e.g., bullying, inappropriate remarks). (Walma, Molen and Juliette, 171) As a whole, these findings reveal that family sitcoms represent a huge range of both positive and negative experiences on children's emotional attitudes.

Works Cited

Berry, Gordon L., Developing Children and Multicultural Attitudes: The Systemic Psychosocial Influences of Television Portrayals in a Multimedia Society, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, ISSN 1099-9809, 11/2003, Volume 9, Issue 4, 2003, pp. 360-366

Bryant, J, A., Television and the American Family, Routledge, 2nd edition, 2000, 300- 350.

Corrigan, C, The impact of television viewing on young children, 2010, ISBN 9781124298979, 2010, 50- 70.

D'Alessio, Maria; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Baiocco, Roberto. Attitudes toward TV advertising: A measure for children, Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0193-3973, 2009, Volume 30, Issue 4, 2009, pp. 409-418

Earles, KA; Alexander, Randell; Johnson, Melba; Liverpool, Joan; McGhee, Melissa, Media influences on children and adolescents: violence and sex, Journal of the National Medical Association, ISSN 0027-9684, 09/2002, Volume 94, Issue 9, 2002, pp. 797-801

Harwood, J, The presence and portrayal of social groups on prime-time television, Communication Reports, ISSN 0893-4215, Volume 15, Issue 2, 2002, pp. 81 -- 97.

Meidl, Christopher and Meidl, Tynisha, Did…

Sources Used in Document:

Works Cited

Berry, Gordon L., Developing Children and Multicultural Attitudes: The Systemic Psychosocial Influences of Television Portrayals in a Multimedia Society, Cultural Diversity and Ethnic Minority Psychology, ISSN 1099-9809, 11/2003, Volume 9, Issue 4, 2003, pp. 360-366

Bryant, J, A., Television and the American Family, Routledge, 2nd edition, 2000, 300- 350.

Corrigan, C, The impact of television viewing on young children, 2010, ISBN 9781124298979, 2010, 50- 70.

D'Alessio, Maria; Laghi, Fiorenzo; Baiocco, Roberto. Attitudes toward TV advertising: A measure for children, Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, ISSN 0193-3973, 2009, Volume 30, Issue 4, 2009, pp. 409-418

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