Franklin Denlor Roosevelt Research Paper

  • Length: 6 pages
  • Sources: 8
  • Subject: Political Science
  • Type: Research Paper
  • Paper: #20778673

Excerpt from Research Paper :

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal 1 and 2

The Least Favored from the New Deal

The Impact of New Deal

Helping the Future Generations

The education system

Welfare and Social Security

Regional Development

The Impact on Labor Standards

Measuring the success of the New Deal

Franklin D. Roosevelt and the New Deal 1 and 2

The New Deal measures as one of the greatest experiments of public policy in American history. This Deal was carefully designed by the Roosevelt administration to mitigate the effects of the economic depression of the 30s; it was an effective tool in assisting the country to recover from the effects of the economic crisis. It helped restore many people's livelihoods. The deal was responsible for making the government directly responsible for the welfare of the people; at least in part. the deal encompassed certain provisions that also shifted the Class power dynamics of the U.S. democracy. The New Deal along with the public works and their benefits has been vilified in public glare in recent day.

Thesis Statement:

Discussions touching on the New Deal must be broad. Therefore, we can only explore the highlights that must necessarily include five tenets, i.e. recovery of the economy and development, consumption and income, employment, public works, education and culture housing and cities, politics and democracy and government (Richard A. Walker and Gray Brechin 2010).

The Least Favored from the New Deal

The New deal failed to rescue America from the great depression. In fact, it made it worse. In the course of the life of the New Deal, annual unemployment rate stood at 17.2%. Indeed, it never went below the 14% mark in the 1930s. There were some intermittent recovery stints but even the 1937 peak was still less than those achieved in 1929. In fact, the 1937 one was quickly followed by a crash. The New deal was responsible for the prolonged depression because it doubled taxes and increased the cost of hiring workers for employers. It is believed to have promoted cartels, destroyed food, hiked the cost of living, broke up steady banks, enacted bad labor laws that negatively affected poor African-Americans and channeling welfare spending in a way that excluded the poor people ( Jim Powell 2003). One of the worries of pointing out the causal effects of the New Deal on crime rates is that federal relief funds were not distributed exogenously. It was controlled by the extent of economic distress in each of the cities at any one time. Owing to the contention that crime and unemployment are probably related positively, and might have also contributed to the determination of relief distribution, ordinary least squares, referred to as OLS in brief, estimation of the effect of the relief spending on crime might have shown upward biasness (Ryan S. Johnson, Shawn Kantor and Price V. Fishback 2004).

The Impact of New Deal

The deal approached the food problem by giving Congress the responsibility to promulgate an agriculture agenda, nationally, in increments that would be implemented periodically. Indeed, owing to the level of poverty at the time, the New Deal represents one of the most significant government interventions in agriculture. Its legacy is as a result of creating a defining moment and the social and economic framework it developed. The Jurisprudential importance of the New Deal is usually emphasized. In order to eliminate the negative conditions that aggravated hunger in the nation, and shortfalls in the economy, the New Deal facilitated a new parameter in the agriculture sector that focused on the importance of the selection and of consumer input. The new presence in USDA links the past New Deal with the agricultural agenda of present day (Guadalupe T. Luna 2004).

Helping the Future Generations

The education system

The New Deal came to the aid of many institutions. Educators therefore assumed that public institutions would also be assisted. The federal government was now more involved in lives of its citizens in matters such as housing, transportation, employment, and food under FDR. However, the federal government, interestingly, did not increase its participation in the education system. FDR was responsible for creating the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). In his early day, FDR had access to the benefits of his family as they spent their summer holiday at Compobello Island. He sailed and hiked on this Canadian island. The youth that were seeking employment in the course of depression made them dispirited and more frustrated. The CCC led the young people to participate in natural conservation activities because he believed in benefits that accrue from nature. The American Youth Congress drew the attention of Charles Taussing and Mrs. Roosevelt. Charles Taussing was FDRs main advisor in both communist leanings and the frustration with the New Deal. The FRD administration was well aware of the susceptibility of the youth to groups that were led by strong, figures that could incite violence; courtesy, the lessons from Europe (Permeil Dass 2014).

Welfare and Social Security

In less than three months, FDR had virtually created a new America. The start of the American welfare state is attributed to the initial 100 days. It was the first time that the federal government had sought to assist the poor citizens. Social security and the formulation of unemployment law in 1935, the institution of Medicaid and Medicare was attained; thanks to FERA. The regulatory state of modern day also owes its presence to the Hundred Days. The Securities and Exchange Commission was created a year after the promulgation of the Truth-in Securities Act. There would be a Federal minimum wage before the New Deal came to an end. There would also be the National…

Sources Used in Document:

Reference List

Adam Cohen. 2009. "The First 100 Days." Time, June 24.

Jim Powell. 2003. How FDR Prolonged the Great Depression. Policy Report, CATO.

Gavin Wright. 2010. The New Deal and the Modernization of the South. Qualitative Analysis, Federal History online.

Guadalupe T. Luna. 2004. The New Deal and Food Insecurity in the "Midst of Plenty."Research Article, DRAKE JOURNAL OF AGRICULTURAL LAW.

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