African-Americans During Early 1900's the Term Paper

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At the same time, however, the ghettoes resulted from the people's desire to form a united community to which they could relate and that could offer comfort from a society that, despite its more opened views, still viewed blacks from the point-of-view of the segregation policy.

The ghettoes however represented an environment that would later offer one of the most important and relevant elements of the American culture: the music and religious atmosphere that was traditional for the black community. As a means of resisting the struggle against segregation and inequality, many communities saw music as the connection that united all black people in their suffering. The soul music thus became a means of expressing both sorrow and joy, hope and despair among the black communities. Even though such practices had been seen in the South as well, once the Great Migration started, the black people exported their core values and transmitted them to the societies they entered in contact with. This would eventually lead to an acceptance of such cultural elements, and later they would become a trademark for the American culture. Similarly, the religious nature of the black community influenced the white communities and the overall American heritage because it proved the importance and need for a religious connection between the members of a community in times of struggle. The same idea would be evoked by Martin Luther King in his numerous speeches relating to the unity of the black community and its importance for the American culture.

Overall, it can be concluded that the reasons for the Great Migration lie in the overall background of the event. The internal factors, such as the decrease in the need for rural work, the rapid industrialization of the country as a whole, along with the natural disasters that took place during this time, represented the motivated argument for the phenomenon. While discussing the consequences of the migration, it cannot be precisely stated whether they represented a full step forward for the black population or not. Even so, the black migration north represented an essential event in the shaping of the culture of the U.S.

Bibliography

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Trotter, Joe William. The Great Migration in historical perspective: new dimensions of race, class, and gender. Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991

Tracee Sioux, African-American migration. (New York:the Rosen Publishing Group, 2004)

Spencer R. Crew, "The Great Migration of Afro-Americans, 1915-40." Monthly Labor Review (1987)

Encyclopedia Britannica, Jim Crow law, 2007. 28 April 2007 http://www.britannica.com/eb/article-9043641/Jim-Crow-law/

P. Jenkins, a history of the United States. (New York: Palgrave, 1997)

Library of Congress. The African-American Mosaic. 2005. 28 April 2007. http://www.loc.gov/exhibits/african/afam008.html

Steven Hahn, a nation under our feet: black political struggles in the rural South from slavery to the Great Migration. (New York: Harvard University Press, 2004)

P. Jenkins, a history of the United States. (New York: Palgrave, 1997)

Steven Hahn, a nation under our feet: black political struggles in the rural South from slavery to the Great Migration. (New York: Harvard University Press, 2004)

James G|rossman, "Great Migration." The Electronic Encyclopedia of Chicago. 2004. 28 April 2007 http://www.encyclopedia.chicagohistory.org/pages/545.html

African-American World. The Great Migration. Educational Broadcasting Corporation. 2002. 28 April 2007 http://www.pbs.org/wnet/aaworld/reference/articles/great_migration.html

David Johnson, "Important Cities in Black History," Black History Month, 2006, 28 April 2007 http://www.factmonster.com/spot/bhmcities1.html

Joe William Trotter, the Great Migration in historical perspective: new dimensions of race, class, and gender. (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 1991).

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